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Thread: Air Freight - UK to Argentina

  1. #17
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    Doncha just love it when the plan comes together

    ... And it did

    ... Details of Argentinian customs clearance process will follow the happy snappy in due course
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    “Every man who dreams has a screw loose. Awarding them that screw will not make them sane.
    On the contrary, it will prevent them from losing that bright madness of which they are proud."

    Benito Quinquela Martin

  2. #18
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    The Gruesome Details

    ... Wrote this up for James Cargo who very succesfully air freighted The Prawn to Buenos Aires for me (+44 (0)1753 68772 - Mark Burgess ) and for anyone else who's interested (sorry it's so long!)...

    Jetting a bike into Argentina

    You’ve left your pride and joy in the hands of the air freight company and you step nervously onto your flight to Buenos Aires. If everything goes according to plan you will be re-united in a day or two. But what will you have to do to get your bike out of Buenos Aires international airport?

    There appear to be two choices, each has its own merits: -

    Option 1 – Contact Dakar Motos in Buenos Aires

    Dakar Motos, Carlos Tejador 1379, C.P.1604CLA Florida, Vicente Lopez
    +54 11 4730 0586 www.dakarmotos.com dakarmotos@hotmail.com

    Sandra and Javier have the necessary expertise to help you complete the customs documentation and can arrange transport for your crated machine to their workshop, or to another location, to ready it for the road.

    The big benefit of this method is that you have expert assistance to help you negotiate the system as quickly as possible. You will get advice in advance of how and what to pack with you bike and will have experts to assist you with any unanticipated hitches. This will be of interest to anyone who is not confident of dealing with local bureaucracy in Spanish.

    You may not want to ride your bike out of the airport fully loaded in unfamiliar territory and the service offered by Sandra and Javier will give you time and space to do things at your own pace. Bear this in mind if you have no prior experience of Argentina.

    Option 2 – Do it yourself

    If you’re a confident traveller, perhaps with experience of Buenos Aires and Argentina, and with some knowledge of Spanish you may want to go through the process on your own.

    You will need: -
    - Your national drivers licence and an International Driving Permit (IDP)
    - Argentinian 3rd party insurance, acquire from
    ATM (Assitencia Total de Motoristas), Sarmiento 930, 3rd Floor
    Buenos Aries – Tel +54 11 4394 1750
    Mon-Fri Only, this is downtown so do it the day before the bike arrives
    - National registration document and title to your machine
    UK reg docs are not regarded as ‘titles’ take your original sale invoice
    - Passport
    - Carnet de Passage if you have one for countries you intend to visit other
    than Argentina
    - Basic packing list – Bike reg# ‘X’, riders clothes, service spares etc,
    avoid excessive detail
    - Screwdriver (Phillips), swiss-army knife
    - 12v compressor or foot pump, tyre pressure gauge,
    - A litre or two of fuel if your bike has been shipped with a totally drained tank.
    Plus whatever other ‘rebuild’ tools you need
    if they are not packed with the bike.
    - A pick-up truck and driver if you need to recover your crate (Dakar Motos!)
    - GPS or a map book, available from Shell and other gas stations.
    - At least 500 Argentine Pesos, mix of denominations

    1 – Go to the freight terminal (Terminal de Cargas) at Ezeiza airport and locate the office of the airline that has shipped your machine. They will provide you with the landing documents for a fee. I paid ArPs150 ($50) which I believe is typical, if not standard.

    2 – From the airline office go across to the freight ‘Depositorio B’ and locate the office for ‘Particulares’. You need to start at the Aduana (Customs) Office 2 where they will first try to get you to produce a carnet-de-passage, although this is not strictly required it makes life easier for the customs people. A little charm and politeness will help you to start the process for a temporary tourist import, an initial form is filled out for you.

    3 – Your bike must be located ‘in the system’ so you will be transferred to the Terminal de Cargas staff inside the warehouse (not customs) who will get a warehouse address within the Depositorio and reference number for you. It can take an hour or two for this to happen after landing.

    4 – Go back to customs administration (office 2) who will then complete their internal documentation before referring you to a customs agent (office 3), who is responsible for checking that what you say you are bringing in is really what is in the crate (engine and frame numbers).

    5 – They will ask you to make copies of any documents they feel necessary at the Terminal de Cargas office. You WILL go back and forth for an hour or so getting each box ticked, be patient (or use Dakar Motos). Lunch and other normal interruptions will add delays that you are powerless to deal with. There is a canteen and snack facility by the airlines offices if you need to kick your heels for an hour.

    6 – Physical examination of the bike. Make sure you know where your frame and engine numbers are located. This is where you will need the screwdriver and swiss-army knife.

    7 – If all goes well you will get permission to uncrate and ‘rebuild’ your bike. You will have to surrender you passport to the Agent and are not allowed to leave yet. Keep the bar-coded Terminal de Cargas label from the crate (swiss army knife)

    8 – Return to Office 3, where they will give you the near-completed import document folio and your passport. You may not leave yet.

    9 – Go back to the Terminal de Cargas office. You will need to pay ‘storage’ which sounds daft if the bike only arrived that day, but it encompasses ArPS220 ($70) for the fork-truck which moved your ‘heavy-load’ and ArPs70 ($30) because it is also classed as ‘dangerous’ cargo. You can’t fight it pay it, but you can use a credit card if you need to.

    10 – Take your receipt back to office 2, and then office 3 as instructed, where the final stamps will be added to the folio and the agent will issue the temporary import document. I had to sign on about 20 dotted lines at this stage. All being well the Agent will shake your hand and wish you ‘suerte’ … luck!

    11 – You can go, but only when the security guard in the warehouse has checked your receipt and taken a copy.

    12 – Head to the exit gate as directed, about 50 meters from the Depositorio warehouse, here is the final check from a customs Agent. He is looking for an itemised exit receipt and the label from the crate. If you have lots of loose gear, such as tyres and camping stuff strapped on, he/she may well question you, don’t lose your cool tell him everything is ‘juntos’ (together). I am told people have been turned around here, so at the risk of repeating myself be calm and you should be able to ride out

    13 – Except that is for getting out through the parking area barrier without paying for parking … I did, but I’m not entirely sure how!

    14 – There is a gas station just in front of the terminal buildings, the next one is 10kms towards BsAs, but you need to come off the highway at a junction to reach it.

    15 – You will need 1peso and 40 centavos in tolls for the auto-pista to get back to downtown BsAs if that’s where you’re heading - 2007 prices.

    Top-Tips

    Whatever happens be polite, be charming and let the bureaucrats you deal with understand that this is a great opportunity for you to visit Argentina, that you are a decent friendly person and wish to co-operate. Customs have their job to do, they will let you through if your stuff is in order, if you’re a real charmer they will help you along.

    Do not lose your cool and get ‘antsy’ as each new apparent ‘hurdle’ presents itself.

    Do not offer any document not asked for, especially your packing list (although you should keep one to hand), you may get a temporary bike import certificate without a hitch and end up paying duty, or the even more complicated ‘agregado’ (added value duty) on spark-plugs, tyres or other spares you are carrying.

    Do not underestimate how much time a ‘smooth’ import process will take, 3-4 hours for paperwork and an hour of re-build time and you’re ahead of the crowd, budget all day for a morning flight arrival.

    You’ll need to be hell of a packer to get your crate on the back of the bike!

    It is entirely possible to get the bike out on your own and intensely satisfying to do so, but it’s not for the fainthearted.

    Dakar Motos will charge you for their services, but may save you heartache and additional costs if they can help you avoid additional storage charges and duty payments on tools, riding gear, camping gear and service spares. They can also give you lots of other valuable advice and they offer other bike related services including workshop facilities. I would recommend you pay Sandra and Javier a visit if you’re in Buenos Aires anyway they are great friends to all bike adventurers
    “Every man who dreams has a screw loose. Awarding them that screw will not make them sane.
    On the contrary, it will prevent them from losing that bright madness of which they are proud."

    Benito Quinquela Martin

  3. #19
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    Hi John,

    And so you have arrived, you jammy bastid. Not that I'm jealous or anything. Oh no, not me.

    A detailed and useful post there on the import procedures which will be of interest to others going that way.

    Have a great time mate. Post plenty of pics and reports please.
    There are two opinions of the GS. There are those who have ridden one who think its fantastic and there are those who haven't who know its crap.

  4. #20
    Deleted account rno
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    Good luck on your travels there, John.

    I've phoned my Uncle Josef in BsAs and told him to have a cold bier ready for you

  5. #21
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    Ezeiza airport cargo terminal charges to import one motorcycle

    2007 – Inc 1 day storage $200
    2010 – Inc 4 days storage $400

    Daily storage is running at nearly $40 so get any shipper to time your bike’s arrival carefully. You must also assume similar increases when shipping your bike out again.

    Good news you can now pay TCA charges on plastic.
    (Customs Duty is paid to the Banco Nacional at the cargo terminal, I haven't got a ****ing clue what forms of payment they accept.)

    Otherwise the system in 2010 runs pretty much as it did three years past. Be polite, friendly and helpful and the TCA and Customs staff soon get on your side to get you going.
    “Every man who dreams has a screw loose. Awarding them that screw will not make them sane.
    On the contrary, it will prevent them from losing that bright madness of which they are proud."

    Benito Quinquela Martin

  6. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Bede View Post
    Ezeiza airport cargo terminal charges to import one motorcycle

    2007 – Inc 1 day storage $200
    2010 – Inc 4 days storage $400

    Daily storage is running at nearly $40 so get any shipper to time your bike’s arrival carefully. You must also assume similar increases when shipping your bike out again.

    Good news you can now pay TCA charges on plastic.
    (Customs Duty is paid to the Banco Nacional at the cargo terminal, I haven't got a ****ing clue what forms of payment they accept.)

    Otherwise the system in 2010 runs pretty much as it did three years past. Be polite, friendly and helpful and the TCA and Customs staff soon get on your side to get you going.
    what are you shipping (or shipped) out? pics please

  7. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Decster View Post
    what are you shipping (or shipped) out? pics please
    ... I helped Pumpy do the customs and cargo terminal procedures to bring in her DRZ-400 on a temporary import permit



    ... But as the Bishop said to the actress, size is not important
    “Every man who dreams has a screw loose. Awarding them that screw will not make them sane.
    On the contrary, it will prevent them from losing that bright madness of which they are proud."

    Benito Quinquela Martin

  8. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Bede View Post
    ... I helped Pumpy do the customs and cargo terminal procedures to bring in her DRZ-400 on a temporary import permit



    ... But as the Bishop said to the actress, size is not important
    and what Bishop would not want to renounce celibacy for such a

    have a gud'un.

  9. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Decster View Post
    and what Bishop would not want to renounce celibacy for such a

    have a gud'un.
    ... You'll be wanting to talk to Possu
    “Every man who dreams has a screw loose. Awarding them that screw will not make them sane.
    On the contrary, it will prevent them from losing that bright madness of which they are proud."

    Benito Quinquela Martin

  10. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Bede View Post
    ... You'll be wanting to talk to Possu
    is he a bishop blessed

  11. #27
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    heading to S America myself

    This is all very helpful, I am planning to head to BsAs in Jan/Feb 2012.
    I have given myself a year off to circumnavigate the continent.
    Apart from the obvious things, the one thing that i can't seem to work out is; can you get Petrol easily in Patagonia/Tierra del Fuego? or do you have ot carry extra?

    Thanks
    Delb

  12. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delbert View Post
    This is all very helpful, I am planning to head to BsAs in Jan/Feb 2012.
    I have given myself a year off to circumnavigate the continent.
    Apart from the obvious things, the one thing that i can't seem to work out is; can you get Petrol easily in Patagonia/Tierra del Fuego? or do you have ot carry extra?

    Thanks
    Delb
    ... There are road maps available in Argentine gas stations that mark all major fuel stops in both Argentina and Chile (can't remember the brand but they're red!)

    ... 'oop north there are 200 mile stretches without fuel (how the ferk you manage to live there defeats me, but hey ho!.) You will find some gaps nearly as long down south.

    ... Basically you strap-one-on! A cheap, plastic, five litre jerry, or even empty pop bottles (eventually they melt, but if you top your tank off early rather than later that's not a problem.)

    ... Argentina and Chile have good quality fuel, but occasionally they run out in remote areas. If they do ask around, locals will hoard fuel for just such an event. Argentina is cheaper for fuel than Chile.

    ... If you're doing the whole continent you will undoubtably enjoy the smooth, effortless power of Bolivian 84RON at some point

    ... Altitude is another factor that will test your bike and it's fuelling

    ... Have fun and pop into the Norton Rat's for a beer if you pass through Cusco
    “Every man who dreams has a screw loose. Awarding them that screw will not make them sane.
    On the contrary, it will prevent them from losing that bright madness of which they are proud."

    Benito Quinquela Martin

  13. #29
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    Hi

    I'm also planning a trip to south america so it would be great to tic tac on planning. I want to airfrieght my GS there. Plan to do the 'motorcycle diaries' route
    When you going, what route?

    Brian

  14. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Dublin View Post
    Hi

    I'm also planning a trip to south america so it would be great to tic tac on planning. I want to airfrieght my GS there. Plan to do the 'motorcycle diaries' route
    When you going, what route?

    Brian
    ... Check out 'Revolution Road' dot COM, two septics followed the route of Guevara and Granado on vintage single cylinder Nortons. The original Che journey finished with the motorcycle in Chile and continued by other means. The Revolution Road team carried on with what they believed was the planned route on their bikes.

    ... Air Freight, James Cargo of Colnbrook are probably the best source of information and assistance.
    “Every man who dreams has a screw loose. Awarding them that screw will not make them sane.
    On the contrary, it will prevent them from losing that bright madness of which they are proud."

    Benito Quinquela Martin

  15. #31
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    Excellent post, thanks for sharing.

    I'll hopefully be arriving in BsAs in a couple of weeks, I'll let you know if prices our procedures have changed

  16. #32
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    Thanks to this post, releasing my bike from customs could not have been easier. Even with my limited Spanish, which consists of pointing at stuff and mumbling.

    The process is still the same and the costs are similar to the last account.

    NOTE - The ATM insurance company has moved. Their new address is:
    ATM, Florida 833, Floor 2

    My best tip is when struggling with something at the airport, just smile and wave. Smile and wave people

    Thanks again

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