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Thread: Overtaking

  1. #49
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    Every time I have had a car with blues come up behind me some twat has buggered it up for them.

    I try to find a good place to pull over so it can get past even with oncoming, if by stopping I will slow it up more I will carry on a bit until i can let it past, most lemmings just jam on the anchors and as stated you end up with two staionary cars, one on each side of the road forming a block.

    On several occasions I have seen a car coming up behind, pulled right over only for some dickhead behind to try and overtake me.

    The biggest shame is the plod are obviously far too busy to nick them for due care, I reckon if they have video they should do so later, or at least send out a "you twat" letter.

  2. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rasher View Post
    Every time I have had a car with blues come up behind me some twat has buggered it up for them.

    I try to find a good place to pull over so it can get past even with oncoming, if by stopping I will slow it up more I will carry on a bit until i can let it past, most lemmings just jam on the anchors and as stated you end up with two staionary cars, one on each side of the road forming a block.

    On several occasions I have seen a car coming up behind, pulled right over only for some dickhead behind to try and overtake me.

    The biggest shame is the plod are obviously far too busy to nick them for due care, I reckon if they have video they should do so later, or at least send out a "you twat" letter.
    I try to do the same, nicest one I had in car was saw range rover with blues catching me up, so I sped a little to get to a layby as he reached me, was nice getting a wave from the co-pilot.

    Thanks for the replies Giles and Micky

  3. #51

    Responding to Blue Lights

    Some good commnets coming from the forum, but it would make life at lot easier if other drivers where taught how to react to Emergency Vehicles. When I teach, I tell the drivers, wait for a positive reaction from other vehicles and drivers - Then respond to the change in speed or direction.

    Sorry to High Jack this article on overtaking, but some good stuff here. Here is a clip of some Blue Lighting:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wz6B60JIGj8

    Regards

    Nigel

  4. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by advancedbiker View Post
    Some good commnets coming from the forum, but it would make life at lot easier if other drivers where taught how to react to Emergency Vehicles. When I teach, I tell the drivers, wait for a positive reaction from other vehicles and drivers - Then respond to the change in speed or direction.

    Sorry to High Jack this article on overtaking, but some good stuff here. Here is a clip of some Blue Lighting:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wz6B60JIGj8

    Regards

    Nigel
    I always used to teach riders to see what, where and when the blue light will reach them and then react accordingly. Far too much panic driving or just plain dumb such as stopping for no reason instead of just moving over, or trying to move out of the way but just getting in the way instead.

    A good blue light pilot will have picked a route most of the time anyway and only needs a small amount of co-operation for it all to work.

  5. #53
    Quote Originally Posted by giles lamb View Post


    So whilst half of me compleeeetly agrees with some of the people (like Timolgra) of this parish who advocate 'just get on it and ride....', I also believe that you need tools in your back pack that you learn how to use, become unconsciously good with them, and then you 'just ride'..
    That's exactly what I've meant in past comments, practice your riding (and driving) without thinking too hard.

    I sometimes give myself a running commentary through the autocom and realise there's not enough time to actually say all the things you're mentally taking on board with little effort and utterly impossible on a fast enduro bike for example
    KEA

  6. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timolgra View Post
    I sometimes give myself a running commentary through the autocom and realise there's not enough time to actually say all the things you're mentally taking on board with little effort and utterly impossible on a well ridden GS for example
    Ho Tim, d'ya need Autocom to talk to thisen

    Well I just talks to misen, dun't need Autocom, but I know what you mean

    I will often give myself a running commentary and as you say, when on form there aint enough time to talk about what you're seeing. I suggest to students don't just tell me what you're seeing ... but what you're doing about it ... it matters!

    Adventure.GS
    Tours, training or custom made earplugs ... it's all here.

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  7. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Micky View Post
    Ho Tim, d'ya need Autocom to talk to thisen

    Well I just talks to misen, dun't need Autocom, but I know what you mean

    I will often give myself a running commentary and as you say, when on form there aint enough time to talk about what you're seeing. I suggest to students don't just tell me what you're seeing ... but what you're doing about it ... it matters!

    I use an autocom because it makes me feel less of a twat talking out loud to myself

    What am I going to do about it?
    Generally nothing needs doing, because it's already sorted (unconsciously).....and that's why the self commentary is so difficult for me
    KEA

  8. #56
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    Commentary

    Quote Originally Posted by Timolgra View Post
    That's exactly what I've meant in past comments, practice your riding (and driving) without thinking too hard.

    I sometimes give myself a running commentary through the autocom and realise there's not enough time to actually say all the things you're mentally taking on board with little effort and utterly impossible on a fast enduro bike for example
    This "private commentary" seems to be a feature used by quite a few riders. I was taught to do this many years ago when undergoing training and I found it a really valuable tool. I still use it, and often find myself chatting away inside of the old full face. Interestingly, I find that I'm usually quite hard on myself when judging circumstances, as far as speed allows, trying to see the others point of view and not just blaming "the tw*t" coming the other way etc. I find that by being a bit introspective and analytical helps me to keep a balanced view. All that notwithstanding, I do acknowledge the presence of many "tw*ts" on our roads

    You're both certainly right about the time factor, and when quicking it a bit you have to be more selective about the stuff you include in the commentary. Occasionally I get asked to demonstrate a commentary when driving, and although I'm out of practice the passenger concerned has always been astonished at the amount of information I process, something that we sort of take for granted. They just can't believe what I'm seeing and reacting too.

  9. #57
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    I used to give the odd commentary mainly to show to learner students roughly what and how fast your eyes and brain are processing info.

    Many years ago I said to my girlie that "she was the 1st person that made me want to have an intercom" She has since decided otherwise

    My favourite funny regarding intercoms was when i taught a Marine based in Plymouth who had been "under the radar" on his Fireblade for a time before...

    He told me how he had taken his girlie pillion on the 'Blade from Plymouth to Germany in the middle of winter "Got as far as Exeter services before I turned the fackin' thing off...!" and by Dover it was "shut the fack up or yer walkin'...."

    I usually wear earplugs

  10. #58
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    Sometimes the reasons for doing a commentary is not always understood. As has been pointed out the faster you go ,the more difficult it is to get the words out before you are past whatever it was you were talking about.
    In fact this in itself gives you the answer and the real reason for doing a commentary in the first place. The faster you go the further up the road you should look .So by having to talk about what you can see, you have to look as far as you can see thus improving your observation,and this is one of the main reasons for doing it
    I have heard many comentaries where the driver is so busy trying to fit everything in that it becomes a nonsense. that against some Police instructors who ,even at silly speeds could talk in a relaxed manner but pointing out hazards and describing their actions well in advance. It is an art in itself.

  11. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by advancedbiker View Post
    Some good commnets coming from the forum, but it would make life at lot easier if other drivers where taught how to react to Emergency Vehicles. When I teach, I tell the drivers, wait for a positive reaction from other vehicles and drivers - Then respond to the change in speed or direction.
    Yesterday going to work (in the car) I was going down a long narrow residential road (tall victorian houses close to the road with very little visibilty into the junctions). Police van, blues but no siren, coming towards me. His way was blocked by a car waiting to turn right with indicators on. Police van was about 150 yards behind him, I was probably about 80 yards from the car waiting to turn right. No problem I thought, the van will be reluctant to overtake a car waiting to turn right and if the van rolls off slightly the timings are right for me to get past the car, car turns right, hazard gone, van continues up the road.

    No no - van - doing about 50 - goes for the overtake on the car waiting to turn right just as I'm coming to it, going for a gap that isn't there forcing me onto the pavement.

  12. #60
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    Firstly I should point out that not all Police drivers are Advanced trained and of course there are idiots as in any walk of life. When I was a young plod vans and Panda cars did not have blue lights or sirens so only advanced traffic drivers could do the blues ant twos thing. Made sure we did not rely on the lights without proper training. Vans especially in rural areas only had a blue light for use when stationary. It is inevitable that when you give some young bobby a vehicle with a blue light on the top and then tell him that he needs to get to an urgent job that he is going to drive like a pratt.

  13. #61
    yep, I was there! Used to drive Pug 306's around Gravesend and Dartford. I look back now and cringe ....

  14. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by giles lamb View Post
    yep, I was there! Used to drive Pug 306's around Gravesend and Dartford. I look back now and cringe ....
    Minivan WWW604G pale blue with white doors, Heartbeat style round Barnsley during the late sixties

    Pick a drunk up ... no problem, drop him off on someone else's patch

    Adventure.GS
    Tours, training or custom made earplugs ... it's all here.

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  15. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by pastyman View Post
    Sometimes the reasons for doing a commentary is not always understood. As has been pointed out the faster you go ,the more difficult it is to get the words out before you are past whatever it was you were talking about.
    In fact this in itself gives you the answer and the real reason for doing a commentary in the first place. The faster you go the further up the road you should look .So by having to talk about what you can see, you have to look as far as you can see thus improving your observation,and this is one of the main reasons for doing it
    I have heard many comentaries where the driver is so busy trying to fit everything in that it becomes a nonsense. that against some Police instructors who ,even at silly speeds could talk in a relaxed manner but pointing out hazards and describing their actions well in advance. It is an art in itself.
    Exactly that. I often give myself commentaries and have to get into the habit of shortening my comments, being a bit more 'clipped' in my delivery, particularly pressing on.

    Giles, many thanks for these threads. I did my advanced training a while ago and have been meaning to redo it again as I know I'm rusty. These threads are acting like a brushing up and make me think even more about my riding when I go out. I'm off in a short while for a week around the country visiting friends and will be remembering this and putting it into practice along my way.

  16. #64
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    agree with the above. I have read all of these and not done much riding recently until saturday on an IAM rideout. BTW someone fell off on ice under trees. It seems like a lot to remember but little light bulbs kept flashing on
    - don't stick to the line find the best surface
    - link the bends together lining up the white line on exit
    - hang back for overtaking
    - look down the inside to get a better view
    - look far ahead to the critical bend which may be after those you are approaching
    - use all the road when safe

    these are just a few of things i think i was doing better but I now know I have learned a lot from these threads. thanks Giles et al


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