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Thread: Threadlock- how to remove

  1. #1
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    Threadlock- how to remove

    Intending to fit new discs and stainless studs to my RT,but after removing one of the studs to measure it and order up the replacements it was a right pig to get back in due to the excessive amount of threadlock applied at the factory. It required more than the recommended torque just to screw it in, due to the resistance from the dry threadlock. The threads aren't crossed by the way!
    So, can anyone recommend a suitable way to remove the old threadlock? Some sort of solvent perhaps?.

    I am tempted to run a tap down the threads but would imagine this will remove metal as well, so that would be the last resort really.
    Need to get it all out as the stainless studs, being softer, won't stand the abuse to get them in satisfactorily. Also i want the new ones to go in smoothly to get the torque setting right.
    Any info appreciated.
    Cheers

  2. #2
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    Airline to Blow hole clear of loose debris

    Tap of correct size and pitch

    Down Hole blow out debris again

    Next Hole

    When you fit the New bolts you use medium strength and torque up as per manual

    Or go and buy the BMW original bolts with the Microencapsulated threadlock already on the bolt
    Oh Great and Wise Deity, Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,

    Courage to change the things I can! And the wisdom to know the difference!

  3. #3
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    Check the manual to see if they need heating prior to removal. The para lever bearing bolts use a thread lock that needs heating first, maybe those are similar?

  4. #4
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    Schit I didn;t read that all up at the start

    You must heat the original bolt up first before attempting to slacken it!!!

    If you don't You'll probabt F*** the head of the torx or allen and leave you in difficulty!
    Oh Great and Wise Deity, Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,

    Courage to change the things I can! And the wisdom to know the difference!

  5. #5
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    threadlock

    [QUOTE=DrFarkoff;3468973]Schit I didn;t read that all up at the start

    You must heat the original bolt up first before attempting to slacken it!!!

    If you don't You'll probabt F*** the head of the torx or allen and leave you in difficulty![/QU

    Yeah, luckily the studs weren't too badly corroded so the torx bit was a good tight fit and didn't 'let go' or round off but certainly wouldn't want to give stainless studs the same level of abuse- usually Allen head rather than the more robust Torx type as well i believe. Cheers

  6. #6
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    Heating.

    Quote Originally Posted by red1 View Post
    Check the manual to see if they need heating prior to removal. The para lever bearing bolts use a thread lock that needs heating first, maybe those are similar?
    The Haynes manual just says to remove them and makes it seem simple enough.

    Regarding heating them up- presumably a hairdrier or paint stripper type hot air gun left blasting at it for a while?

  7. #7
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    Nail varnish remover

    Hi

    Use nail varnish remover that's what I have used makes an easy job, and yes you must use heat it is very easy to burr the head.

  8. #8
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    cut a couple of slots up the length of the thread on the bolt.
    heat the hole up with a heatgun.
    Ease the bolt in a bit -out a bit. The slots should leave enough room for the dead threadlock to gather in.

  9. #9
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    When I used to do my own mechanical bits n bobs on my Landy, I was more likely to come across rusty holes than threadlock, but I would get one of the old bolts and make 1 or sometimes 2 cuts up the length of the bolt with a hacksaw. This gives you the correct size bolt and thread for the hole, but the cuts will act like the teeth of a tap. Running it in and out a few times should help clear it out?

    Nail varnish remover is basically acetone.

  10. #10
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    Den beat me too it

  11. #11
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    Finally got round to replacing the front discs on my RT so just a bit of info for anyone thinking of tackling the same job themselves.
    Easy enough really, just make sure you heat up the studs with a hot air gun. Somebody suggested on here that it might remove the paint off the wheels-- With the wheel on the bench the heat can easily be applied to the stud itself, the disc is covering the alloy of the wheel and dispersing the hot air so no real danger IMO.

    Air gun for 20-30 seconds per stud then move on to the next one for 20-30 seconds and back again to allow the heat to soak in. The studs then come out really easily. I cleaned the threads up with brake cleaner and ran a thread tap down them so the new studs would go in smoothly.
    Discs from Sherlocks. The standard BMW brake pads seem compatible- no squealing or snatching.
    Total cost £180 including new stainless studs, versus £600+ at the dealers.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by steadysteve View Post
    I cleaned the threads up with brake cleaner and ran a thread tap down them so the new studs would go in smoothly.

    this^^^^

  13. #13
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    Click here to find out how to remove these ads

    Quote Originally Posted by cookie View Post
    this^^^^

    yes this also, a thread tap should not remove any metal at all if used correctly!

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