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Thread: clutch slip

  1. #1
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    clutch slip

    have been getting some clutch slip, generally when i have to overtake so 5th gear and a handfull of throttle.
    i have read many posts and am trying to follow a methodical approach so have so far ruled out excess fluid in clutch lever res,
    hand guard not obstructing. decided to take starter off too have a peak in there, i have found quite a lot of dust like material that appears to have some metallic content, there does not appear to be any oil can any body see from the pic? any advice greatly received
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  2. #2
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    well either way it needs to come to bits,when i had the same problem it was the clutch slave cyclinder leaking ,and fluid was travelling along the push rod onto the clutch,i replaced the clutch and the cyclinder also i put a small cut in the gearbox were the cyclinder bolts onto the box so if it ever were to happen again the fluid would just dribble down the back of the box.

  3. #3
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    To my eye that clutch dust is sticking to something?
    Take the slave cylinder off to see if it’s damp in there,the rear input seal may have started leaking a bit and may be putting some oil down the hollow centre where the clutch pushrod resides.
    overland and classic

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ross. View Post
    have been getting some clutch slip, generally when i have to overtake so 5th gear and a handfull of throttle.
    So what is the bike?? How many Miles?

    If you have 50 K or more then it is quite likely that it just needs clutch!

    At least if its an 11xx you can strip it without special tools (well apart from the two tie down straps that are needed!) and once its stripped you check for oil contamination etc etc (It does look kinda oily at the bottom of the flywheel there
    Oh Great and Wise Deity, Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,

    Courage to change the things I can! And the wisdom to know the difference!

  5. #5
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    Being used to peering at the edge of the clutch friction plate side-on, I find the angle of your shot a bit too sharp for looking at the situation at a dead right-angle. Usual check once you've removed the starter motor is to get a long screwdriver and poke at the edge of the clutch pack with the clutch lever zip-tied to the bar and the bike in first. Then turn the unit whilst watching to see if the spline ( the tiny bit you can see ) turns - thus discovering if there's excessive slop, indicating spline or clutch plate hub wear.

    It's true what they say above - that pesky, gold-durned Magura-brand slave cylinder, designed for use only in pushbikes, is prolly the culprit. Pulling the bike apart isn't as nightmarish as you'd think. Just follow the various vids on the Toob.

    This one shows son Tim splitting a Rockster and looking at the necessary area. And don't forget that if a new friction plate is needed for whatever reason, excessive thinness or fluid contamination, don't just waste your money on another Sachs plate. Get the comparatively new Thailand-made plate with the extended-length hub. Usual parts suppliers now have them. About 100 snoojits / 85 squidlets.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZyND-O1zfoY

    AL in s.e. Spain
    The list of folks I'd trust with my bike.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ross. View Post
    have been getting some clutch slip, generally when i have to overtake so 5th gear and a handfull of throttle.
    i have read many posts and am trying to follow a methodical approach so have so far ruled out excess fluid in clutch lever res,
    hand guard not obstructing. decided to take starter off too have a peak in there, i have found quite a lot of dust like material that appears to have some metallic content, there does not appear to be any oil can any body see from the pic? any advice greatly received
    As already suggested, it would appear to be a worn out friction plate.

    Replace.
    Thomas! There's a mouse duck in the house!





  7. #7
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    so i pulled the slave and this i what i found, all though not full of oil it is moist in there and smells like gear oil to me so could be
    a leak from that seal maybe it does look like it has been damaged poor fit by some ham fisted mech? any way pics for view..
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  8. #8
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    It looks pretty much like mine did when I pulled mine apart. It was too late for me, it'd leaked brake fluid all over the clutch. In my case it was the bearing in the middle that was the catalyst, it had developed a large amount of play and fluid had made its way past it.

    I had clutch slip shortly after noticing this and replacing the slave cylinder, it was only in high gears with a heavy hand of throttle though.

  9. #9
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    Many riders posting on other forums drill the slave sylinder with a small hole to allow any leaking fluid to drain downwards out of the cavity to avoid that kind of fluid contamination of the friction plate. Even when replacing the cylinder with a new one - preferably from BBY in the USA who seems to be able to source a more robust version of this paltry inadequate component.
    A new friction plate should nowadays be the Thailand version with the longer hub.

    The list of folks I'd trust with my bike.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by sykospain View Post
    Many riders posting on other forums drill the slave sylinder with a small hole to allow any leaking fluid to drain downwards out of the cavity to avoid that kind of fluid contamination of the friction plate. Even when replacing the cylinder with a new one - preferably from BBY in the USA who seems to be able to source a more robust version of this paltry inadequate component.
    A new friction plate should nowadays be the Thailand version with the longer hub.

    hi yes i have seen the modded plates so will be fitting one £80 from the uk, wow i can buy a full kit for a car for that money, us bikers really get stiffed

  11. #11
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    well that went better than i thought 2.5 hours and no broken bones or bleeding
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  12. #12
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    Next time keep the G/box attached to the rear end, it's less to dismantle plus you can wheel it away.
    But thats pretty good result.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by flatdog View Post
    Next time keep the G/box attached to the rear end, it's less to dismantle plus you can wheel it away.
    unless you want to check the output shaft seal and pivot bearings while you're at it

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