Bead breaker - suggestions?

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Changed my rear tyre over at the weekend.

My plan was to use a G-clamp for breaking the bead but the ones I have were either not deep enough or wide enough.

Did it in a bench vice in the end but could do with something handier really.

I've had a scan around but can't see anywhere selling G-clamps big enough. All you get it plastic crap in the local shops. None on ebay.

I don't want to go splashing out or it kind of defeats the object of doing your own.

Any ideas?
 
The sidestand of your own bike works quite well.
Either use the spare bike if you have one, or if the GS in on the centre stand, get a couple of people to guide the bike and just tip it over with the sidestand pushing down onto the bead, the weight breaks the bead nicely. It can be done with the rear wheel removed, not sure how easy it would be with the front wheel out.
 
Use a shovel. Fit the curve up against the rim push down and off it pops.
 

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there's a guy on here who made 'em all outta aluminium and plastic stuff:thumb can't find the link at the moment....
 
think i read in tbm about riding your bike very slowley with flat tire for a little distance is enough to break the bead
 
The most effective bead breaker i've seen was an old dunlop tyre lever (about a foot long, and an inch wide).

These particular ones had been modified by putting a 90 degree fold about an inch from the flat end, giveing the lever much more power against the side of the tyre.

You then push the end with the bend between the rim and the tyre, and when it was suitably in, you just pushed it towards the tyre, and after a couple of pushes it would pop the bead off.

IIRC this came from the guy that runs the "IN chains" bike shop down in the new forest...

And the best bit is they are easy to carry...
 
Changed my rear tyre over at the weekend.

My plan was to use a G-clamp for breaking the bead but the ones I have were either not deep enough or wide enough.


You're doing it wrong.

Try putting the G-clamp through the spokes and sliding it up onto the rim of tyre from the bottom if you get what i mean.

I always take a G-clamp with me on long trips. Much more useful for doing more than breaking beads.

Bead breakers tend only to break beads. :thumb
 
You're doing it wrong.

Try putting the G-clamp through the spokes and sliding it up onto the rim of tyre from the bottom if you get what i mean.

I always take a G-clamp with me on long trips. Much more useful for doing more than breaking beads.

Bead breakers tend only to break beads. :thumb


Duh:blast I didn't really think about it when I couldn't find the big old clamp I had in mind.

Bleedin obvious really:thumb

Now I've just remembered where that clamp is too - I put it on my mothers garage door after she let it fly.

The shovel looks a simple 'at home' idea.

The side stand one could be handy if you were travelling with someone else on a GS too.

I'll go and get a light one from B&Q or somewhere to keep with me (for when I go on a road trip to Tesco:D)
 
I really am losing it - thought that said bread maker - suggestions ?
 

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With a smaller G-clamp, one that will not go over the tyre, put two tyre levers in on opposite sides of the tyre.

Press the fully deflated tyre inwards by pressing the levers together, then slip the G-clamp over the compressed tyre.
 
Rode for miles on a rear flat (tubed) which eventually ( 5 miles....:nenau )broke the bead & from then on I had to push as it was impossible to ride. Reason being, as the camber changed so did the direction of the bike. Rode/pushed a Norton 99 from Filton College to the village of Olveston.
Had a front flat & for aforsaid reasons, the bike was impossible to ride ( on the road) & extremely difficult to push. To do so on a motorcycle, to break the bead on a tubeless tyre, is nonsense....
 


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