Blown off

Wierpig

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Hi. Riding over pennines today on m62.Very windy and got me thinking just how much it would take to blow one off so to speak.Ever happened to you?
 
I can remember one really windy day riding on the A20 between Folkestone and Dover where it is quite close to the top of the cliffs. I had to lean a whole lot into the wond to go straight, to the extent that I was still leaning to the left slightly to follow a gentle right-hand curve in the road.
 
I can remember one really windy day riding on the A20 between Folkestone and Dover where it is quite close to the top of the cliffs. I had to lean a whole lot into the wond to go straight, to the extent that I was still leaning to the left slightly to follow a gentle right-hand curve in the road.


It's a bit like sailing me thinks. You sometimes have to do a tack to get round the next bend.


There is a trick :rob

Stay relaxed, be vigilant, DON'T hold on tight to anything (not even with your knees) and remember that obstacles (of any kind) will cause imbalance and possibly a change in direction.

As long as the bike is driving you forward 'even gently' you will have control. As soon as you stop or slow to walking pace and coast with the clutch in, or simply relax your guard. You will be blown about and possibly even off.

In my experience it is the input (or lack of it) of the rider that causes problems with balance on a motorcycle. Holding too tightly to the bars is a big problem. You shouldn't be holding the bars at all, simply resting your hands on them. Put your weight in the seat and simply guide the bike with your hands using the counter steering method, along with upper body movement.

You'll then find that most bikes large or small will go exactly where you want them too.
Don't forget about visual fixation. You go where you look. This is also known as 'hole in the hedge syndrome'. Look at the hedge, make a hole in it.



.
 
it doesnt take a lot to blow me off, i aint fussy, female and with a pulse will do
 
In all seriousness, I find when riding in high winds if you go as fast as you can it's better. It's only at lower speeds that you get into any difficulties. Keep on the throttle and you'll be alright.
 
A constant wind on an open road isn't much of a problem, its gusts of wind which will help you leave the road:aidan
 
Do you remember the BMW rider (Dave Jones?) who was blown off the road and ended up in a ditch with a fence post through his abdomen? About 20 years ago now, coming off the Severn bridge in my crusty memory. It does happen.......
 
To add to the fun

To add to the fun of driving in high winds try it off-road on loose gravel. For those with the time and money I reccomend Patagonia. Next, let us discuss how much does it take to blow a train off the rails :augie
 
In all seriousness, I find when riding in high winds if you go as fast as you can it's better. It's only at lower speeds that you get into any difficulties. Keep on the throttle and you'll be alright.


I'm with the Monkey on this one :p

If you get to the right speed you make your own wind :eek: Err as it were.

But you do have to be more cearfull in the recent gusty weather, and I'd be very cearfull how I discribed it to a novice.
 
I was coming home on the A68, the Blackbird, fully loaded with luggage, and me, all of this together is not an insignificant weight....:eek:......

I ended up going slower because I wasn't happy about it all, the side winds were terrifying, I initially moved into the guttering on the left, a gust hit me and actually took me sideways across two lanes and into the other side of the road's gutter looking down a very steep banking

I never got to try going fast after that, but would most definitely not recommend the slow approach entirely....
 
We had to cross DK west to east a few years ago on a 595 in the most appalling side winds I have ever known. Faster was not really better either but we had a ferry to catch.

Lorries were a nightmare as coming out of the shelter of the lorry we would catch the wind and lurch towards the armco. I took to aiming for the front of lorries as I tucked back into the inside lane, the hard shoulder was littered with bikes parked up under bridges to get out of the wind.
 
Had a car and trailer Blown Off

Hi. Riding over pennines today on m62.Very windy and got me thinking just how much it would take to blow one off so to speak.Ever happened to you?

Ignoring the alternative blow jobs for a moment :eek:onyack

Many years ago was heading north on M74 near Gretna with a kart in a light box van trailer when I realised wind was getting V. Strong. So turned off motorway to seek a more sheltered route home, but unfortunately exit road was V. exposed and wind blew trailer up on 1 wheel, sort of jack-knifed against bootlid. Ouch! says I, small dent in boot lid to fix.

But things went from bad to worse on A7 when a gust of wind blew down into a valley and completey flipped the trailer over onto the right side; fortunately no oncoming traffic at that moment.

Then things went from worse to worser as the trailer unhitched itself from the car - Pug 405 - and the now unloaded car dived straight through a fence into a wet field and did a couple of rolls, before coming to rest sunny side up, but minus a few windows. My specs had even flown off my face and exited the now open driver's window.

Outfit and I arrived home late that night on back of rescue wagon. Car was total write off. :(

Glad I was travelling alone for once.
 
I can recommend strong side winds as a deterrent to tail-gating car drivers. There are a few stretches of the M6 through Stafordshire that really catch the wind, especially raised flyovers. Being hit on the bike by a big gust is apparently so terrifying to following vehicles that they instantly brake and give you about 100 yards extra clearance. It's great!

I agree with the relax and don't fight it approach as it's pretty much self correcting insofar as the bike gets blown away from underneath you which steers it back on track. Once you get used to it it's really good fun, a bit like hang-gliding.

The real danger, as also mentioned, is gaps between trucks which can funnel a short sharp blast onto just the front wheel as you pass. This is not nice as it's not self correcting and can happen without warning.
 
Last eyar passing through Glen Coe area the wind was that bad tyou struggled to keep it in a straight line. On one occasion the gust was so severe I couldn't turn backk against it and was seconds from deciding sod this Im going into the verge and waiting when the wind dropped sufficiently for me to steer back onto my side of the road. To say my arse was clenchign was an understatement
 
There is a bridge in Hobart called the Tasman which traverses the Derwent River. The winds really howl up the valley and when exposed a decent angle of lean is required to maintain direction. The problem is that each end, there are vertical concrete panels for some reason and they act as wind breaks. All of a sudden wind pressure reduces to zero but lean still in place and things get interesting. Good fun to watch others who dont expect it.

:augie
 
If you're going in a straight road at speed, you've got no problem as long as you've got room for manouvre as you do need to swerve a little. Worst case is a gust whilst cornering, especially one which pushes you over more which makes you think you've washed out the front.

The worst wind I've ridden in was across the north coast of Scotland. I had to constantly lean seaward at quite an angle which allowed me to go round some corners at speed whilst bolt upright, which is quite funny. Had the tyres with the soft edges on - which were ripped to shreds having effectivly done 50 miles around a right hand corner :)
 


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