Recommend me BINOCULARS . . .

see things that are far away

Get thee GS out the garage, head for port.... then keep going... thal see loads of things places that are far away.

Gramps
 
well, if you really want THE BEST, Swarovski 'EL' 8x42. You'll not find a man on a mountain in Scotland (with a rifle) without a pair. 10 x 42 for a wider field a view. Got £1200 to spare?

Failing that, Leica are the next best...

Failing that Nikon make a decent optic, as do Canon.

Really depends what you want to spend and what you want them for. If you are serious about buying bins, always try and view them at dusk when the light is bad. You won't get a good idea if they suit your eyes in a shop.
 
I can see the sun with the naked eye - and it's 92,900,000 miles away.........


How far were you hoping to see? :nenau

Al :D
 
well, if you really want THE BEST, Swarovski 'EL' 8x42. You'll not find a man on a mountain in Scotland (with a rifle) without a pair. 10 x 42 for a wider field a view. Got £1200 to spare?

Failing that, Leica are the next best...

Failing that Nikon make a decent optic, as do Canon.

Really depends what you want to spend and what you want them for. If you are serious about buying bins, always try and view them at dusk when the light is bad. You won't get a good idea if they suit your eyes in a shop.

Second that have a pair myself for exacly that purpose , that said i have mates who use Leica and say they are better.

HTB, your not a million miles from me you a shooting man yourself ?

Keith
 
I've got leica 8x22s. They're very good. If I had to buy some more, I might think about getting Canon Image Stabilising binoculars, cos of the image stabilisation, allowing more power..
 
Second that have a pair myself for exacly that purpose , that said i have mates who use Leica and say they are better.

HTB, your not a million miles from me you a shooting man yourself ?

Keith

Leica are great (I have a Leica rangefinder with stunning optics) but I have 'Swarovski eyes' and prefer the optics - I think that's the important thing about bins; you HAVE to try them yourself because we're all different (..must go and watch Life of Brian - 'we are all individuals...').

I've been known to have a little shoot, ahem, 'once in a while' - anything that means I have to keep both eyes open and 'not' aim, and that stuff where I have to aim and appear out of bushes and from behind tufts of grass, generally covered in a little DPM.
Not much call for that in Surbiton though. Always slightly disappointed that the law frowns on me strapping armaments to my GSA forks to head off down to the counties...:pullface
 
+1 for Leica

I treated myself to some Leica 10x25 binoculars some years ago. I am still impressed with them, their clarity, ease of use, field of view when wearing glasses. They are well built, have a lifetime warranty and having dragged them around the world, have not a mark on them. Despite only having a 25mm front element, the amount of light they capture is amazing, great in high contrast situations too.

Nick
 
Search out a binocular demo local to you. Often there are demo days at RSPB reserves etc where you can try loads. It is a worthwhile experience.

Ace Optics, for example, do several in the SW


A wide field of view makes the experience better when scanning or following moving objects.

If you need to see things that are far away, then a good scope and tripod may be what you need rather than binocukars
:D
 
i got meself a loverly pair of autofocus bins of a chinese guy on the beach in st tropez. they're brillant and cost £25 :augie got red lens on the end:eek:.
have a look at cheaper stuff unless you need to and can afford £1200 ??
will they REALLY be that much better?? i doupt it
 
Leica are great (I have a Leica rangefinder with stunning optics) but I have 'Swarovski eyes' and prefer the optics - I think that's the important thing about bins; you HAVE to try them yourself because we're all different (..must go and watch Life of Brian - 'we are all individuals...').

I've been known to have a little shoot, ahem, 'once in a while' - anything that means I have to keep both eyes open and 'not' aim, and that stuff where I have to aim and appear out of bushes and from behind tufts of grass, generally covered in a little DPM.
Not much call for that in Surbiton though. Always slightly disappointed that the law frowns on me strapping armaments to my GSA forks to head off down to the counties...:pullface

I have been tempted withthe mew leica binos with the range finder buit in , to save carrying both binos and range finder about , nle less thing to leave at the hight seat !

Keith
 
Not trying to teach you to suck eggs, but it might find the info below of help (if you don't know already):

8 x 22:
8x is the magnification and 22 is the size of the front lens (entry pupil 22mm)
8x is good for general purpose and moving subjects (birds in flight) whilst 10x is more powerful :)blast) but the down side can be that they are harder to hold still.

The size of the front lens matters for the amount of light it lets in (how bright the image appears, the larger the brighter) 8x50 will be a lot brighter than 10x50 as there's less glass used for 8x magnification.

Setting them for your eyesight: Close your right eye, focus the Bino's on a still object, then open both eyes and adjust the right eyepiece with the diopter markings on until the image appears sharp for both eyes.

Many years ago I used to sell Bino's and I'm still amazed how many shops can't tell you how to set the bino's for your eyesight, if the image doesn't line up correctly they will be faulty or cheap. :thumb2
 


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