spokes

happy pilgrim

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pick up new gs1200 this week. i was offered the option of spoked wheels and decided to forgo the pleasure. is there really any need for spoked wheels for the majority of riders?
seems like one helluva lot of work each week cleaning etc.
if you are serious in going off road to the extent of possible wheel damage you would probably be riding a cheaper bike ? or be called ewan macgreger ( can't spell)
 
This is also a subject I've been wondering about. I've put my deposit down on a 1200GS for May, but don't have to confirm the exact spec until January, when presumably the 2005 spec and price is known. Anyway, I think you're right, most won't need them, only the serious off-roaders. What worries me is that I'll try a little off-roading and become hooked. In any case, I may rather have spokes if I hit another house brick on the motorway. So many decisions...

Cheers,
Steve
 
Spokes look nicer. Bit more difficult to clean. Bit heavier. Generally, the best 1200's have spokes.
 
I have been running some hefty offroad with my cast/mag/alu wheels, and I haven't got any dents yet. I guess unless you really travel fast with low tire pressure on bumpy stoney roads you end up risking a dent on the weeles.
 
been waiting nearly 3 EFFING months for my GS now and if i hadn't ordered mine with SPOKES, i'd be riding a ubiquitous alloy wheeled GS now. but the wait is worth while as a GS is not a GS if it is not with SPOKES!

not sure if this is true but my dealer told me because i have ordered mine with SPOKES it is the reason why i am having to wait so long comparing to some of you guys out there.:mad:
 
I much prefer the look of the spokes despite the cleaning, over the last 20 years ive had a couple of alloy wheels that have had dents and a buckle from poor road(not off road)conditions
 
happy pilgrim said:
pick up new gs1200 this week. i was offered the option of spoked wheels and decided to forgo the pleasure. is there really any need for spoked wheels for the majority of riders?
seems like one helluva lot of work each week cleaning etc.
if you are serious in going off road to the extent of possible wheel damage you would probably be riding a cheaper bike ? or be called ewan macgreger ( can't spell)


Spoked in front and cast in the back, this is the way forward.
 
AusSteve said:
This is also a subject I've been wondering about. I've put my deposit down on a 1200GS for May, but don't have to confirm the exact spec until January, when presumably the 2005 spec and price is known.

For what it is worth, I was told by SPC last month to expect a 5% price hike in January.
 
Went your belting down some South american highway and you hit a pot hole and bugger a few spokes you can fix your bike....

If you've got a GS with spokes you can dream of adventure... The question is do you dream of adventure? if Yes get spokes
 
I dream of adventure but this turns quickly to nightmare when i try and clean the spokes.

When i come to ordering a 12 it'll be with the alloys.
 
I always clean the wheels with a small brush thingy that attaches to the end of a hose then coat them with some scotoiler spray. Cleaning the wheels on the GS doesn't take any longer than the alloys on the RT.
 
as i said in a different thread, the exact price hike is 800 quid-ish!
 
Why I went for wire spoke wheels

You don't need to have wire spoke wheels... I'm sure HMR (did I get that right?) will come along and say that the alloys are lighter, and can be repaired if you dent them. And this is very very true.

However, I went for the wire spoke wheels for a few reasons;
- I like the looks of them, the alloys in my opinion would suit something like a VFR. :rolleyes:
- They don't cost that much more, and hopefully they might make the bike worth a bit more in the future.
- I love the technical design of the BMW spoked wheels where you can replace spokes with the tyre in situ - that to me is really cool! :cool:

I don't like that they're heavier... the bike is heavy enough as it is... but "ya makes ya choice".

I also don't get this cleaning bit; what makes wire spoke wheels so much harder to clean? I clean most of my bike with a normal dish-washing-brush and plenty of water. I have got tons of different size/style brushes that I use. I've even got a bog-brush... Works just fine for me...
 
Re: Why I went for wire spoke wheels

TheJoker said:
You don't need to have wire spoke wheels... I'm sure HMR (did I get that right?) will come along and say that the alloys are lighter, and can be repaired if you dent them. And this is very very true.


The alloys are lighter, and can be repaired if you dent them! ;)

R12

Also - take a look at my friends KTM after driving the same 2000 km offroad trip as I did.

KTM

Question: Are spokes really stronger?
 
boz - any pics of your bike with the spokes - i didn't even notice you had spokes when we were out last week - totally agree , spokes look the biz
 
Tobers said:

Spokes look nicer. Bit more difficult to clean. Bit heavier. Generally, the best 1200's have spokes.

I actually think that the 'open' side of the alloy rear wheel is a work of art.

I must be me but I find it almost sensual;)

I wouldn't change for spokes, no way.

(I see a poll coming on here)
 
Cast alloy wheels can be repaired? Well I thought so too until a couple of months ago when I ran over a 4"x4"x3ft lump of scrap iron in the Dartford Tunnel on my Pan. The rims, both front and back were dented but I thought a pop down to my local specialist - Motoliner at Aylesford - would soon have them right as rain. Not so. He was certain that once the tyres were removed, he'd find hairline cracks on the inside of the rim close to the 'spokes' - and he did. He declined to have them wleded. So it was two secondhand rims, powdercoating them, and a new Metzeler MeZ4 on the front. £350+. Ouch!
 


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