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NomadLad
14-08-18, 15:51
Hi Everyone,

Just wondering if anyone can give me any info about importing a UK Registered Motorcycle(s) into France?

I'm moving to Lyon next year and I have a '16 R1200GS and a '12 Triumph Speed Triple R, both of which I may decide to take with me.

Can anyone tell me how much hassle and cost is involved in importing them over there?

I have found an article that seems to explain the process pretty well (below) but I'm hoping to hear the more practical side to it.

https://www.frenchentree.com/living-in-france/importing-a-uk-vehicle-and-registering-it-in-france/

I.E what are the costs, waiting times etc, most importantly is it cost-effective and worth the hassle?!

Thanks for any input :thumby:

cecilthecat
14-08-18, 16:18
This is worth a look

https://www.eurococ.eu/en/vehicles-registration

NomadLad
14-08-18, 16:30
Thanks for the reading material! Certainly some helpful stuff in there... Also some worrying stuff (charges :blast ) too!

steve hughes
14-08-18, 17:26
A member on here Biiin can prob assist, I understand he moved out there with his bikes

Steve

NomadLad
14-08-18, 17:30
A member on here Biiin can prob assist, I understand he moved out there with his bikes

Steve

Thanks Steve, will try get in touch with him. Much appreciated :thumb2

NomadLad
14-08-18, 18:55
I may as well post answers as I find them in case anyone comes looking in the same situation...

Here is where you can calculate the cost of your Carte Grise / Certificat d'Immatriculation.

https://www.service-public.fr/simulateur/calcul/cout-certificat-immatriculation

You will need to consult the following website first and find the CV/Fiscal Power in order to complete the above calculator.

https://www.largus.fr/fiche-technique/motos-cyclos.html

I'll update with anymore tips when I get them.

lebowski
15-08-18, 18:07
I've registered one UK bike two years ago and have to register another fairly soon.

The first was registered using the old system and took no more than 2 days of visiting different local offices. Unfortunately the system has changed to an online one and it was (and might still be) having serious delays of up to 3 months or more to get your logbook (Carte Gris). I think this has improved a lot now, however.

Please research and check the following, but just to give you an idea.... You can't register any bike here over 106bhp unless it was fitted with ABS as standard. You will need a Certificate of Conformity which is available from the UK importer, don't pay someone else (ie Eurococ quoted earlier) to do this unless you don't fancy sending a couple of emails and taking some pics (it was that easy with KTM). You will also need a receipt for the bikes showing that VAT was paid (if it was new when you purchased it) or just a hand written one if the bike was bought secondhand. You will also need a utility bill showing your French address. I can't recall if you also need a Certificate de Attestation (proving that you are resident in France and obtainable from your Mayor).

To access the online system you need to register first, which involves your postie verifying your ID(!). Then you can apply online sending scans of the above documents plus your V5. A really good thing to do is make sure every document you provide has the same name and address on, it can have a UK and a French address, but only one of each.

There is a FB group called 'REGISTERING RHD VEHICLES IN FRANCE' that gives excellent up to date advice, including a guide or two.

It might sound daunting but it really is just a paper exercise and as long as you give them everything they ask for, with the right address and name on it, it's fine. The people that have trouble are the ones who don't give them what they ask for!

I think I paid about 100 euros all in for a 04 KTM Adventure. 2nd hand bikes are very expensive here and from experience not well looked after, or presented at a dealer. So unless you want to buy a new bike when you get here, bring your bikes as long as you are 100% that they can be registered here. I thought I'd checked everything before we came here, but I still ended up with four bikes I can't legally ride here as well as being caught when they upped the charges for registering cars here. So if you can get a CoC and the bikes have ABS, I would say bring them, but only if you're good with paperwork. It would cost you a lot more to replace them, like for like, in France.

If you get stuck with anything or have any other questions that I might be able to help with, let me know. I'm hoping to register my 350 EXC in the next 3 or 4 weeks, so should be able to give better info on the new system.

Best advice I can give is the same as someone gave us when we got here, 'don't try to beat The System, because you won't and Keep it Simple, Stupid. The French LOVE admin!

NomadLad
16-08-18, 09:07
I've registered one UK bike two years ago and have to register another fairly soon.

The first was registered using the old system and took no more than 2 days of visiting different local offices. Unfortunately the system has changed to an online one and it was (and might still be) having serious delays of up to 3 months or more to get your logbook (Carte Gris). I think this has improved a lot now, however.

Please research and check the following, but just to give you an idea.... You can't register any bike here over 106bhp unless it was fitted with ABS as standard. You will need a Certificate of Conformity which is available from the UK importer, don't pay someone else (ie Eurococ quoted earlier) to do this unless you don't fancy sending a couple of emails and taking some pics (it was that easy with KTM). You will also need a receipt for the bikes showing that VAT was paid (if it was new when you purchased it) or just a hand written one if the bike was bought secondhand. You will also need a utility bill showing your French address. I can't recall if you also need a Certificate de Attestation (proving that you are resident in France and obtainable from your Mayor).

To access the online system you need to register first, which involves your postie verifying your ID(!). Then you can apply online sending scans of the above documents plus your V5. A really good thing to do is make sure every document you provide has the same name and address on, it can have a UK and a French address, but only one of each.

There is a FB group called 'REGISTERING RHD VEHICLES IN FRANCE' that gives excellent up to date advice, including a guide or two.

It might sound daunting but it really is just a paper exercise and as long as you give them everything they ask for, with the right address and name on it, it's fine. The people that have trouble are the ones who don't give them what they ask for!

I think I paid about 100 euros all in for a 04 KTM Adventure. 2nd hand bikes are very expensive here and from experience not well looked after, or presented at a dealer. So unless you want to buy a new bike when you get here, bring your bikes as long as you are 100% that they can be registered here. I thought I'd checked everything before we came here, but I still ended up with four bikes I can't legally ride here as well as being caught when they upped the charges for registering cars here. So if you can get a CoC and the bikes have ABS, I would say bring them, but only if you're good with paperwork. It would cost you a lot more to replace them, like for like, in France.

If you get stuck with anything or have any other questions that I might be able to help with, let me know. I'm hoping to register my 350 EXC in the next 3 or 4 weeks, so should be able to give better info on the new system.

Best advice I can give is the same as someone gave us when we got here, 'don't try to beat The System, because you won't and Keep it Simple, Stupid. The French LOVE admin!



Wow, thanks for the very informative write-up, I would imagine you know how much hassle this info will save me! I will join that FB group too.

Both bikes are over 106bhp but both have ABS so that’s no issue. (Triumph Speed Triple R and BMW R1200GS)

I’ve talked to my local Triumph dealer about Cert of Conformity for one of the bikes, I think it will be about £100.

So would I be right in saying that all I can really do in advance of moving down there is get my receipts and certificates of conformity in order?

Best of luck with registering the 350EXC, I hope it goes smoothly and hassle-free.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Smogbob
16-08-18, 09:13
Homologation TRIUMPH Street Triple

Amener la moto chez le concessionnaire
• Changement des optiques – 110.28€ l’unité
• Complétion de la fiche « Vérification du véhicule importé » par le concessionnaire

Envoyer à TRIUMPH France
• Facture des optiques
• Fiche de « Vérification du véhicule importé »
• Chèque de 119.60€ à l’ordre de TRIUMPH France SAS
• Photocopie de la carte grise Anglaise
Adresse :
TRIUMPH SAS
19 Boulevard Georges Bidault Croissy Beaubourg
77437 MARNE LA VALLEE Cedex 2

A l’immatriculation
• Justificatif D’identité
• Justificatif de Domicile
• Demande de certificat d’immatriculation (1)
• 1 des 3 exemplaires du formulaire de cession du véhicule (2)
• Ancien certificat d’immatriculation
• Quitus fiscal (3)
• Règlement de la taxe due


Translation

TRIUMPH Street Triple Homologation

Bring the bike to the dealer
• Optical change - 110.28 € each
• Completion of the "Verification of Imported Vehicle" form by the dealer

Send to TRIUMPH France
• Invoice of optics
• "Checked Import Vehicle" form
• Check of 119.60 € payable to TRIUMPH France SAS
• Photocopy of the English registration card
Address :
TRIUMPH SAS
19 Boulevard Georges Bidault Croissy Beaubourg
77437 MARNE LA VALLEE Cedex 2

At registration
• Proof of identity
• Proof of address
• Application for registration certificate (1)
• 1 of 3 copies of the vehicle assignment form (2)
• Old Certificate of Registration
• Tax office (3)
• Payment of tax due

lebowski
16-08-18, 11:58
Homologation TRIUMPH Street Triple

Amener la moto chez le concessionnaire
• Changement des optiques – 110.28€ l’unité
• Complétion de la fiche « Vérification du véhicule importé » par le concessionnaire

Envoyer à TRIUMPH France
• Facture des optiques
• Fiche de « Vérification du véhicule importé »
• Chèque de 119.60€ à l’ordre de TRIUMPH France SAS
• Photocopie de la carte grise Anglaise
Adresse :
TRIUMPH SAS
19 Boulevard Georges Bidault Croissy Beaubourg
77437 MARNE LA VALLEE Cedex 2

A l’immatriculation
• Justificatif D’identité
• Justificatif de Domicile
• Demande de certificat d’immatriculation (1)
• 1 des 3 exemplaires du formulaire de cession du véhicule (2)
• Ancien certificat d’immatriculation
• Quitus fiscal (3)
• Règlement de la taxe due


Translation

TRIUMPH Street Triple Homologation

Bring the bike to the dealer
• Optical change - 110.28 € each
• Completion of the "Verification of Imported Vehicle" form by the dealer

Send to TRIUMPH France
• Invoice of optics
• "Checked Import Vehicle" form
• Check of 119.60 € payable to TRIUMPH France SAS
• Photocopy of the English registration card
Address :
TRIUMPH SAS
19 Boulevard Georges Bidault Croissy Beaubourg
77437 MARNE LA VALLEE Cedex 2

At registration
• Proof of identity
• Proof of address
• Application for registration certificate (1)
• 1 of 3 copies of the vehicle assignment form (2)
• Old Certificate of Registration
• Tax office (3)
• Payment of tax due

I don't understand what you're illustrating?

Is that for a Triumph dealer to register the bike for you, or just to change the headlight and say it's an imported vehicle? Not sure why you would need the 'Checked Import Vehicle' form unless this is for a bike that Triumph can't supply a CoC for. As the bike is a 2012, I would expect the CoC to be available, therefore no need for another form. The biggest problem the OP might have is whether the bike has ABS fitted, because if he hasn't then he either needs to get Triumph to restrict it, or don't bring it here as it will only get a CG after 30 years!

I have a 96 Blackbird that I cannot register here as it is over 106bhp and doesn't has factory fitted ABS. I also have a 98 DR350 and I would need to put it back to stock spec (or find a friendly dealer) so that I can prove it complies with EU specs.

lebowski
16-08-18, 12:20
Wow, thanks for the very informative write-up, I would imagine you know how much hassle this info will save me! I will join that FB group too.

Both bikes are over 106bhp but both have ABS so that’s no issue. (Triumph Speed Triple R and BMW R1200GS)

I’ve talked to my local Triumph dealer about Cert of Conformity for one of the bikes, I think it will be about £100.

So would I be right in saying that all I can really do in advance of moving down there is get my receipts and certificates of conformity in order?

Best of luck with registering the 350EXC, I hope it goes smoothly and hassle-free.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Thanks, if it doesn't then it'll likely be my fault and there's no rush, this is France after all!

Basically yes, just a receipt and a CoC for both, but I can't stress enough, make sure that every bit of paperwork, receipts, V5, Coc, etc., has the same name and address on. I had Jon instead of Jonathan on one bit of paper and it was only after some heavy complimenting on her detective work and a lot of brown nosing, that I got the lady to issue the paperwork I needed to register the ADV. That won't work with the online system. I read this morning they now want a scan of your driving licence and insurance when applying. It's not known if this can be UK licence and insurance yet! You will not believe how bad the French admin system is. £100 seems about the norm for a CoC, some companies do them for free, but not many.

It will save you some hassle, but not as much as you researching that what I've said is the most up to date info! I can't find anything more up to date than the FB group but be careful, don't take what others say as gospel. Mark Rimmer on that site is 99% accurate with his advice and knowledge, he's written the guide on there too.

Good luck with the move, we've been here for just over 2 years now and love it. If there's anything I can help with, give me a shout.

cecilthecat
16-08-18, 12:36
I have an F800GS that I'm looking to register in France and when speaking to BMW France regarding them providing a CoC they said I first need to go to the local BMW dealer and have them inspect the bike to ensure the Headlight dips the correct way and that the speedo reads KPH they would then provide a document to this effect which I could then provide to BMW France for them to issue the CoC.

lebowski
16-08-18, 15:10
I have an F800GS that I'm looking to register in France and when speaking to BMW France regarding them providing a CoC they said I first need to go to the local BMW dealer and have them inspect the bike to ensure the Headlight dips the correct way and that the speedo reads KPH they would then provide a document to this effect which I could then provide to BMW France for them to issue the CoC.

I'm starting to sound like the expert I'm not, but that doesn't sound right.

The CoC simply confirms that the vehicle complies with European regulations, it shouldn't matter which headlamp it has or that the speedo reads in kph or mph. Both my KTMs had the 'wrong' UK headlamp and a speedo that displays both (which I think your GS has?).

It sounds to me that what they might be saying is that a CoC isn't available (how old is your bike?) but they can issue a form that states the bike is the same as one sold in France. To do this you would have to take it to a BMW dealer....

cecilthecat
16-08-18, 15:51
The bike is a 2011 model year, I tried getting BMW UK to issue a CoC but they said they had a backlog of 6 months to issue them hence approaching BMW France. This is their website showing what they needed https://www.bmw-motorrad.fr/fr/service/services/Homologation0.html#/section-importer-depuis-l-etranger

lebowski
16-08-18, 16:05
Six months!?! How on earth can they justify that! It's a paperwork exercise FFS..... That's some customer service, or are they just trying to put people off? I read somewhere that every bike has to be supplied with a CoC when it's new but either the dealers or the importers 'file' them..... If you bought it new it might be worth exploring the fact that you never got one?

KTM took about 24 hours a couple of years ago and about a week with the EXC.

Running that through Google Translate (my French still needs a lot of work) it doesn't mention an actual CoC, just an attestation, which could be what they call it, but I'd check with someone? There's a site Bikersclubfrance that it might be worth checking on, or even the FB page I mentioned earlier.

lebowski
16-08-18, 16:08
Thinking about it.......

It could be that BMW France are just stating it conforms to French specs and therefore it's ok to register..... It could be something that bypasses the CoC.....

Sounds an expensive way of doing it for you though?

Smogbob
16-08-18, 16:14
I don't understand what you're illustrating?

Is that for a Triumph dealer to register the bike for you, or just to change the headlight and say it's an imported vehicle? Not sure why you would need the 'Checked Import Vehicle' form unless this is for a bike that Triumph can't supply a CoC for. As the bike is a 2012, I would expect the CoC to be available, therefore no need for another form. The biggest problem the OP might have is whether the bike has ABS fitted, because if he hasn't then he either needs to get Triumph to restrict it, or don't bring it here as it will only get a CG after 30 years!

I have a 96 Blackbird that I cannot register here as it is over 106bhp and doesn't has factory fitted ABS. I also have a 98 DR350 and I would need to put it back to stock spec (or find a friendly dealer) so that I can prove it complies with EU specs.

It was simply a Frencman who bought his Triumph in England and that is how he got his Triumph sorted, I suppose it will be for the ops Triumph, however the BMW would not need a headlight change, they all point forward.

cecilthecat
16-08-18, 16:59
Thinking about it.......

It could be that BMW France are just stating it conforms to French specs and therefore it's ok to register..... It could be something that bypasses the CoC.....

Sounds an expensive way of doing it for you though?

From what I understood from chatting to BMW France they needed this proof from the local BMW dealer so they could issue the CoC

Redboots
16-08-18, 17:02
I’ve talked to my local Triumph dealer about Cert of Conformity for one of the bikes, I think it will be about £100.


Did you buy the bikes new? EU law states that all EU vehicles should have a CoC as part of the vehicle documentation.
Take your dealer to task on it. Did they send it to DVLA? You want it back.

Even my old shitter SLK of 2003 (from Germany) came with the CoC in the vehicle docs.

Since the new regs on car CT's this year, masking the light IS acceptable to flatten off the L/H flare of RHD motors.
As there is no CT for bikes, the same should apply.

Redboots
16-08-18, 17:06
It could be something that bypasses the CoC.....

There is no way to by-pass the CoC if the vehicle is younger than the date they were brought in.
Some have done it using just the V5, but, It MUST have all the right numbers and that is a rarity from the DVLA.

NomadLad
16-08-18, 18:12
Thanks, if it doesn't then it'll likely be my fault and there's no rush, this is France after all!

Basically yes, just a receipt and a CoC for both, but I can't stress enough, make sure that every bit of paperwork, receipts, V5, Coc, etc., has the same name and address on. I had Jon instead of Jonathan on one bit of paper and it was only after some heavy complimenting on her detective work and a lot of brown nosing, that I got the lady to issue the paperwork I needed to register the ADV. That won't work with the online system. I read this morning they now want a scan of your driving licence and insurance when applying. It's not known if this can be UK licence and insurance yet! You will not believe how bad the French admin system is. £100 seems about the norm for a CoC, some companies do them for free, but not many.

It will save you some hassle, but not as much as you researching that what I've said is the most up to date info! I can't find anything more up to date than the FB group but be careful, don't take what others say as gospel. Mark Rimmer on that site is 99% accurate with his advice and knowledge, he's written the guide on there too.

Good luck with the move, we've been here for just over 2 years now and love it. If there's anything I can help with, give me a shout.

Great stuff, thats my task now! :thumb2

Thanks again for the info, much appreciated. Myself and the missus are living for this move! Hoping to be down in Lyon next Spring!



Did you buy the bikes new? EU law states that all EU vehicles should have a CoC as part of the vehicle documentation.
Take your dealer to task on it. Did they send it to DVLA? You want it back.

Even my old shitter SLK of 2003 (from Germany) came with the CoC in the vehicle docs.

Since the new regs on car CT's this year, masking the light IS acceptable to flatten off the L/H flare of RHD motors.
As there is no CT for bikes, the same should apply.

No, I bought my 2012 Speed Triple privately, earlier this year. And my '16 GS I bought used from a dealer last year. I've emailed the dealer to see if I can get them to dig it up for me! Cheers

lebowski
16-08-18, 18:31
There is no way to by-pass the CoC if the vehicle is younger than the date they were brought in.
Some have done it using just the V5, but, It MUST have all the right numbers and that is a rarity from the DVLA.

I was wondering if the authorities accept a form direct from the French importer, such as when no CoC isn't available because of the age of the vehicle, or that it wasn't originally supplied to the EU. Probably not, but why are they asking for the bike to be inspected at dealer? There's no need, as the CoC is a document that states the bike conforms with EU regs, not French regs. When you get a UK CoC there's no need to have the bike inspected, so why in France? No doubt the dealer will charge for the privilege too.

lebowski
16-08-18, 18:35
Great stuff, thats my task now! :thumb2

Thanks again for the info, much appreciated. Myself and the missus are living for this move! Hoping to be down in Lyon next Spring!



We weren't due to come down here until this May, but the Mrs was so stressed out with work that we found a way to come down two years early. It's been a bit tough financially, but pensions have now kicked in and we're so glad we did this. My only regret is that I didn't make more effort to learn the language before we came down.

Are you planning on retiring or working while you're here?

lebowski
16-08-18, 18:36
Did you buy the bikes new? EU law states that all EU vehicles should have a CoC as part of the vehicle documentation.
Take your dealer to task on it. Did they send it to DVLA? You want it back.

Even my old shitter SLK of 2003 (from Germany) came with the CoC in the vehicle docs.

Since the new regs on car CT's this year, masking the light IS acceptable to flatten off the L/H flare of RHD motors.
As there is no CT for bikes, the same should apply.


Totally agree, it's a con that they charge you for something that should be supplied with a new bike.

NomadLad
16-08-18, 18:59
We weren't due to come down here until this May, but the Mrs was so stressed out with work that we found a way to come down two years early. It's been a bit tough financially, but pensions have now kicked in and we're so glad we did this. My only regret is that I didn't make more effort to learn the language before we came down.

Are you planning on retiring or working while you're here?

It sounds like you made the right choice. If it can be done financially, even if its tough, at the end of the day, quality of life is the most important thing because life is too short.

I've started learning french at a basic level, I'm in a very lucky position that my employer has a base down there and I don't need to speak french for work (it will help though), although I do have every intention of becoming fluent.

I'm still a long way from retirement, which is part of the reason I'm so keen to go now and 'start living'! My other half feels the same, she's planning to try and do some basic language teaching to learn french before undertaking a career down there.

lebowski
16-08-18, 19:27
It sounds like you made the right choice. If it can be done financially, even if its tough, at the end of the day, quality of life is the most important thing because life is too short.

I've started learning french at a basic level, I'm in a very lucky position that my employer has a base down there and I don't need to speak french for work (it will help though), although I do have every intention of becoming fluent.

I'm still a long way from retirement, which is part of the reason I'm so keen to go now and 'start living'! My other half feels the same, she's planning to try and do some basic language teaching to learn french before undertaking a career down there.

Michel Thomas CDs are great and helped us out to start with, we're now having lessons with a neighbour, but I'm hoping to do some 1to1 lessons soon as I'm struggling. It is also difficult as I've been working on the house a lot and so not having the time to get involved with the locals.

We're in a very agricultural area, but from what I've learnt earning money here as a foreigner isn't easy. You can earn money working for Brits, but not for the locals. I taught in the UK, but I've never found any opportunities to use that here. If you're nearer to a city, that might well be different though.

NomadLad
16-08-18, 19:35
Michel Thomas CDs are great and helped us out to start with, we're now having lessons with a neighbour, but I'm hoping to do some 1to1 lessons soon as I'm struggling. It is also difficult as I've been working on the house a lot and so not having the time to get involved with the locals.

We're in a very agricultural area, but from what I've learnt earning money here as a foreigner isn't easy. You can earn money working for Brits, but not for the locals. I taught in the UK, but I've never found any opportunities to use that here. If you're nearer to a city, that might well be different though.

Funny you should say that, it's actually the Michel Thomas CD's that we've been using. Hopefully it will give us a good foundation to start with.

I find it quite tricky as well but my intention is to build the best foundation possible before we go and then go for 1 to 1 lessons combined with a bit of immersion and hopefully after that I will reduce the amount of locals I offend when I talk!

Yeah I must say it is a bit of a concern whether the missus will find work or not but I'm hopeful we'll come up with something when we get down there.
I'll keep us afloat for the first while and we'll see what happens. All part of the adventure!

Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

lebowski
16-08-18, 20:14
You'll do fine and the French never laugh if you try, they love the fact that you make the effort. They will treat you differently if you can't be bothered to try however, after all, it's disrespectful.

One option you might want to check out is doing/making something the ex pats might want but not be able to get. For example, if there was an indian food stall at any of our local markets, they'd sell out in minutes. Everyone misses a curry here......

Despite what some may say, we've found the cost of living is lower here, but then we don't pay over the odds to have British foods, there's no coffee shops, no takeaways, no pubs. We shop once a week and grow some of our own veg. Life here has very different set of values to the UK. Luckily we worked out quite quickly that we're not on holiday, we live here.

Good luck, it sounds like you have the right attitude to make it work and if you ever head over to the Pyrenees, pop in for a cuppa.

Redboots
16-08-18, 21:15
but why are they asking for the bike to be inspected at dealer? There's no need, as the CoC is a document that states the bike conforms with EU regs, not French regs. When you get a UK CoC there's no need to have the bike inspected, so why in France? No doubt the dealer will charge for the privilege too.

When I imported my '94 GS, I had to go to a dealer to get an attestation that it had KPH displayed and that the light dipped right. They did it for free:)
CoC's are not EU wide in all respects. UK vehicles have a different "*e" number because of the headlight and speedo, unless the light is flat dip and speedo changeable.
Its the UK out of step with the rest:D

NomadLad
17-08-18, 05:17
You'll do fine and the French never laugh if you try, they love the fact that you make the effort. They will treat you differently if you can't be bothered to try however, after all, it's disrespectful.

One option you might want to check out is doing/making something the ex pats might want but not be able to get. For example, if there was an indian food stall at any of our local markets, they'd sell out in minutes. Everyone misses a curry here......

Despite what some may say, we've found the cost of living is lower here, but then we don't pay over the odds to have British foods, there's no coffee shops, no takeaways, no pubs. We shop once a week and grow some of our own veg. Life here has very different set of values to the UK. Luckily we worked out quite quickly that we're not on holiday, we live here.

Good luck, it sounds like you have the right attitude to make it work and if you ever head over to the Pyrenees, pop in for a cuppa.

We'll have to do some brainstorming to see if we can come up with something like that. We're from both from Ireland so might be able to come up with some Irish foods or delicacies that might be of interest over there.

Whenever I've visited it always seemed a bit cheaper, once you buy French products. We're hoping to have some space to grow some of our own. Also, one condition of moving over was based on a promise to the missus that we could keep chickens, so at least that should cover the whole eggs situation. :thumb

Likewise, we’ll be set up over there by summer so drop in for a cuppa & an egg sandwich lol

ChasF
24-08-18, 12:44
I've imported various cars, vans and bike into France from the UK and Belgium. Most have had their challenges but the most straightforward was my 1989 R100GS. BMW France supplied a C of C (free for old bikes), changed the headlight (which I don't think you need to do on a modern bike), took the bike to the local dealer for a basic inspection, took the paperwork to the prefecture and got the Carte Grise. Once I got the C of C the rest was done in a morning. I think you'll need a 'Quittance Fiscale' for a newer bike which basically says the VAT has been paid. Also the Carte Grise application is online only now so that's bound to be a shambles.

NomadLad
24-03-19, 11:00
On a slightly different note, but so as not to start a new dedicated thread...

Could anyone explain to me what the deal is with insurance that is sold by Bike Dealers in France as part of a new purchase?

I'm considering getting a new bike when I get down there and it seems a lot of dealers give an option of purchasing insurance as part of the bike purchase or finance.

I was planning on starting a multi-bike policy with my GS and whatever other bike I buy but just wanted to know if I should be considering this insurance?

I'll include a piece of translated text as an example from the French Kawasaki website:

"Z900 95bhp (2018)
For a Rent with Purchase Option, for a Kawasaki Z 900 95 ch 2018 in the amount of € 8,499.00 including VAT over 37 months, after payment on delivery of a first rent plus € 2,549.70 , you repay 36 rents of € 68.84 ** excluding optional insurance. Total amount due excluding the purchase option of € 5,027.94. Purchase option of € 4,249.50, ie a total amount due purchase option included of € 9,277.94 . The monthly cost of optional Sécurivie insurance is € 9.34 and is added to the rents above. The total amount due under optional insurance is € 345.58."

Here is the page https://kawasaki-operations-speciales.com/loa/

Is it just a basic 3rd party type insurance for the vehicle? I was baffled by them giving a fixed fee, it doesn't suggest an assessment of the rider or circumstance.

Thanks! :thumby:

lebowski
25-03-19, 08:46
The insurance they are probably talking about there is to protect the repayments. I certainly wasn't offered insurance when I bought a bike, or any other vehicle.

As far as I know, they don't do multi bike insurance here, if you find company please let me know. Over here the bike is insured not you, so each bike has to be insured separately. Incidentally, once a bike is insured here, it has to stay insured even if you're not using it. So you either have to sell, scrap it, or prove that it cannot be used or harm anyone.

Get ready for a world of paperwork....

NomadLad
25-03-19, 08:52
Ah I see! I've already begun with this world of paperwork in setting up a bank account and renting a house, Its unbelievable!

Wow, so no multibike policies... that would suggest running a second could be quite a bit more expensive in France... hmmmm

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lebowski
25-03-19, 09:02
Please check what I've said, I'm pretty sure I'm right as I tried to do it when we arrived. I came over and registered my 950 and then insured it, then I bought a 1290 Adv and wanted to take the 950 of the road to refresh it. When we went into our friendly AXA agency, they explained the law to us, but they did find us the lowest quote they could, so that the bike was just insured 3rd party.

If you're planning on bringing vehicles and becoming tax resident, you ain't seen nothing yet! Apparently the Gendarmes are planning a big purge on UK registered vehicles when we leave the EU. Far too many brits running around on UK plates, with no MOTs and dodgy insurance. They've been so inundated with driving licence exchanges that they're refusing to accept new ones at the moment, just to clear the backlog.

On the plus side, it's been sunny and 22 degrees this weekend and the forecast is for more of the same for the next week....

Wapping
25-03-19, 09:08
I see that the bike is ‘rented’ or, I guess ‘leased’ under some sort of finance deal?

I suspect that it is nothing more than a top-up insurance policy that pays the difference between the invoice price and the market value, should the bike be stolen or destroyed or guarantees the payments in the event of some calamity.

The dealership should be able to explain it to you; it’s them that is selling the vehicle and the insurance.

NomadLad
25-03-19, 09:10
Please check what I've said, I'm pretty sure I'm right as I tried to do it when we arrived. I came over and registered my 950 and then insured it, then I bought a 1290 Adv and wanted to take the 950 of the road to refresh it. When we went into our friendly AXA agency, they explained the law to us, but they did find us the lowest quote they could, so that the bike was just insured 3rd party.

If you're planning on bringing vehicles and becoming tax resident, you ain't seen nothing yet! Apparently the Gendarmes are planning a big purge on UK registered vehicles when we leave the EU. Far too many brits running around on UK plates, with no MOTs and dodgy insurance. They've been so inundated with driving licence exchanges that they're refusing to accept new ones at the moment, just to clear the backlog.

On the plus side, it's been sunny and 22 degrees this weekend and the forecast is for more of the same for the next week....

I will, thanks. Now that I've got an address, just waiting to sign papers, I can get a few quotes. AXA will be my first port of call.

I've got most my docs ready to register the GS so hopefully that will be relatively straight forward, I've opted to just pay someone experienced to do all the ANTS stuff for me.

I'm just bringing the GS and my missus is bringing her Irish registered car for the first couple of months while I shop around for a new one. Luckily we both have Irish Licenses so might keep things a little more simple.

Cant wait to get down to that lovely weather!



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lebowski
25-03-19, 09:11
I see that the bike is ‘rented’ or, I guess ‘leased’ under some sort of finance deal?

I suspect that it is nothing more than a top-up insurance policy that pays the difference between the invoice price and the market value, should the bike be stolen or destroyed.

The dealership should be able to explain it to you; it’s them that is selling the vehicle and the insurance.

It could well be that, as they are big on gap insurance here, although they do like to offer payment protection. Apparently they can be heavily fined if they are found to have lent you money (in effect) when you can't afford the repayments.

NomadLad
25-03-19, 09:14
I see that the bike is ‘rented’ or, I guess ‘leased’ under some sort of finance deal?

I suspect that it is nothing more than a top-up insurance policy that pays the difference between the invoice price and the market value, should the bike be stolen or destroyed or guarantees the payments in the event of some calamity.

The dealership should be able to explain it to you; it’s them that is selling the vehicle and the insurance.

Ah I get ya. I figured it was the equivalent of PCP.

I've heard of that type of insurance on cars but never with bikes over here.

Yeh I intend to go have a chat with the dealers when I finally get down there, just trying to do some homework before and don't speak enough French to give them a call.

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lebowski
25-03-19, 09:20
I will, thanks. Now that I've got an address, just waiting to sign papers, I can get a few quotes. AXA will be my first port of call.

I've got most my docs ready to register the GS so hopefully that will be relatively straight forward, I've opted to just pay someone experienced to do all the ANTS stuff for me.

I'm just bringing the GS and my missus is bringing her Irish registered car for the first couple of months while I shop around for a new one. Luckily we both have Irish Licenses so might keep things a little more simple.

Cant wait to get down to that lovely weather!



Sent from my SM-G950F using Tapatalk

Cars are very expensive here and if you're after a specific model and spec be prepared to hunt high and low for one. We're hoping to buy a van at the moment and can only find 2 in the whole of France. If you can hack driving your car here, then stick with it, once it's here it will seriously drop in value and mean you'll probably have to make a trip back to sell it.

Most insurance brokers here are franchises of whoever they represent, so you can only get their products. However if you find a good one, they certainly seem to look after you. Our local office handle our home and bike insurance and will be doing the van. They also insure SWMBO's bike. When she renewed recently we went in to pay and with pen poised over cheque book the guy said, oh that looks expensive and with a few taps on the keyboard reduced the price for us. It really pays here to build relationships with dealers, shops, brokers etc....

If you're planning on staying, make your first call to the mayor's office to get an attestation which says when you became resident in the village/town. You can use that for everything, as it proves when you arrived, when you became resident.

lebowski
25-03-19, 09:23
don't speak enough French to give them a call.

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Probably the hardest thing to master...... I email and check my french with google and linguee

leadfarmer
25-03-19, 09:31
Hi chaps

Just seen this thread so I thought I'd chime in

Lebowski is right about insurance, multibike does not exist here, some companies will give you 10% off a second policy but that's about all

I have always found AMV to be the cheapest https://www.amv.fr/


If you have proof of your past insurance contracts bring it with you, it takes 13 years here to get to 50% no claims and if you've never been insured here you may have to start from scratch
I was lucky enough to be able to prove my insurance history when I arrived and got to keep my no claims bonus
I use Direct assurance for cars, they are almost always the cheapest and they accepted my proof of UK history
https://www.direct-assurance.fr/


The finance packages here are not as interesting as PCP from what I can tell, the "assurance" mentioned is indeed an insurance for the loan against injury or job loss usually although this is generally not worth the money

If you are going to be working here in your current company but on a french speaking site you will learn the language quickly

I came here 20 years ago and spoke almost no French but working all day in french you you just pick it up, within 6 months you will be getting by no problem, after 2 years you'll be pretty good orally
Reading comes quickly but writing is a lot longer, spellcheck & grammar check helps a lot !

lebowski
25-03-19, 09:36
Hi chaps

If you are going to be working here in your current company but on a french speaking site you will learn the language quickly

I came here 20 years ago and spoke almost no French but working all day in french you you just pick it up, within 6 months you will be getting by no problem, after 2 years you'll be pretty good orally
Reading comes quickly but writing is a lot longer, spellcheck & grammar check helps a lot !

Probably why I struggle so much with my french. I can just about get by and I'm having 2 lessons a week now, but as I don't work and the area is very quiet we've not interacted as much as we wanted to. It really pays to get involved with as much as possible.

leadfarmer
25-03-19, 09:40
Probably why I struggle so much with my french. I can just about get by and I'm having 2 lessons a week now, but as I don't work and the area is very quiet we've not interacted as much as we wanted to. It really pays to get involved with as much as possible.

It does indeed

If you've got friends there force yourselves to speak in French even if they want to practice their English

Watch TV in French, watch the evening news etc, that gives you short subjects with lots of context, I learned a lot that way in the beginning

lebowski
25-03-19, 10:11
It does indeed

If you've got friends there force yourselves to speak in French even if they want to practice their English

Watch TV in French, watch the evening news etc, that gives you short subjects with lots of context, I learned a lot that way in the beginning

Even our french friends want to speak english with us!

When we first arrived I started coaching at the local football club and my french improved so quickly. Unfortuantely I had to stop through ill health and so consequently only parlering with friends doesn't help matters.