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Thread: i2i Motorcycle Academy Transform your riding

  1. #1
    tomkilleen
    Guest

    i2i Motorcycle Academy Transform your riding

    "Bikes are incredably stable, riders get in the way" If you want to learn how to do full lock turns, brake so hard that the back wheel comes off the ground, and corner with confidence. Read on!!!

    Transforming your riding

    How would you feel if I said that you could?
    • safely control a front wheel skid.
    • calmly induce and control a tank-slapper.
    • confidently deal with a bend that unexpectedly tightens up.
    • safely bring your bike to a halt in about half the distance you think you can.
    • be significantly more confident in the wet or on slippery roads.
    • cure panic-braking forever.
    • confidently do low speed turns or circles in the road - even two-up.
    How would you feel if I said that your bike is infinitely more stable that you realise but that you are actually making it less stable than it was ever meant to be.

    So, how do you feel?
    How you feel about each of these questions says something about the “stories” you have created or accepted in your riding, and about the freedom you are losing by allowing these stories to take control of your riding. Whether you felt cynical (where’s the catch?), sceptical (I don’t believe him!), interested (I like the sound of this!), relieved (hooray, there is an answer!), confused (what’s he saying?), angry (I don’t like this guy!), disinterested (why would I want to do these things?) or cocky (I don’t need this, I have ABS, traction control, heated grips, etc.) you can completely transform your riding and your enjoyment of biking by understanding and unlocking these “stories”.

    So, what are stories?
    “Stories” are accepted or intuitive beliefs about the way things are. They are “myths” about riding that just aren’t true. Importantly, “stories” create instinctive reactions, thoughts and behaviours in your riding that make you significantly less safe, confident and smooth than you should be.

    For example, some common stories are: there is very little grip in the wet; heavy bikes are difficult to control at slow speeds; if the front or back end slides it happens suddenly and without warning. While these stories are not true, if you intuitively believe them to be true, your riding will be slow and tense in the rain; you will shy away from low speed manoeuvres; and you will wonder why others are able to ride so quickly and confidently while you live in fear of a front or back wheel slide. By the way, stop and think about how you reacted to the line “these stories are not true” – did you agree, disagree, decide to suspend belief or re-read the examples to look for “the catch”.

    Some stories are given to us when we start biking. Others we develop for ourselves over the years. Some are based on the way you understood things to be when you rode in the 1980s or 90s (it’s dangerous to ride over white lines or metal grates in the wet; if you use the front brake while cornering you’ll lose the front end). Some are based on your understanding of generally accepted beliefs (tank-slappers are dangerous; counter-steering only happens above 15mph). While others are simply a mis-interpretation of something that happened to you when something didn’t go according to plan (because I lost the front end, I crashed; the back end stepped out and I was nearly off). Most often these self-reinforcing “stories” generate fear and over-cautious riding when things start to get “difficult”. Often they cause you to develop “survival reactions” that can make you a hazard waiting to happen. In all cases they suppress your riding, reduce the fun and freedom of biking and make you less safe that you should be.

    You can transform your riding
    The good news is that it is possible to understand the stories you have created or accepted, dispel the myths and release the vice-like grip they have on your riding. The result is a complete transformation in your riding – where the fears you have created simply disappear. More of the fun and freedom returns to biking and you become a significantly safer and smoother rider.

    Over the past few years we have been pioneering a new approach to motorcycle training by combining rigorous psychological principles, rapid learning techniques and new research into riding principles. The result is a series of four one-day Machine Control training courses designed to help transform your riding (see attached for a brief outline of each course).

    If you’re interested in hearing more, give us a call or email.
    (If you’re affiliated with a bike group, we would happily present to your group.)

    Tel: 07968 837974/ 01430 330170 or E-mail: info@i2imca.com
    (web-site: www.i2imca.com)




    Machine Control 1 – using your own bike (training takes place on an airfield)

    Section 1.1: Bike Stability Exercises
    In this section you will learn why bikes are inherently stable and understand the stories around what does and doesn’t make a bike unstable. This section contains a series of very unusual exercises to help you learn how to maximise the stability of your bike.

    Section 1.2: Advanced Braking
    In this section you will understand the stories around braking; including why panic braking occurs, how to avoid it, and how to quickly and confidently bring your bike to a halt.

    Section 1.3: Counter-steering
    In this section you will understand the stories around changing direction and how to use counter-steering to improve the speed, accuracy and confidence of your cornering

    Section 1.4: Hazard Avoidance
    In the next two sections you will learn about the stories, behaviours and instincts you have created around dealing with unexpected hazards. Building on the earlier braking and counter-steering sections, you will learn how to control the bike quickly and confidently to avoid a hazard.

    Section 1.5: Hazard Non-Avoidance
    In this section you will learn what to do and what not to do (and why) when you come across a hazard that you cannot avoid. To help you develop the correct instincts and ability to deal with this type of situation, you will get to practice hazard non-avoidance under controlled circumstances.

    Section 1.6: Slow Speed Machine Control
    In this section you will understand the stories you have created about slow speed control and learn advanced techniques for controlling your machine at slow speeds



    Machine Control 2 – using off-road bikes (training takes place off-road)

    Section 2.1: Bike stability exercises
    In this section you will learn more about why bikes are inherently stable and how to use body position and throttle control to maximise the stability of your bike. This section contains an exercise to help you learn how your body position affects the stability of (and your confidence in) the bike, when riding over slippery surfaces.

    Section 2.2: Front wheel skids
    In this section you will understand the stories you have created about front wheel slides. Importantly you will learn how to prevent, recognise, induce and control a front wheel skid on a slippery surface.

    Section 2.3: Rear wheel skids 1
    In the next two sections you will understand the stories you have created about what happens when the back wheel slides and learn how to induce and control rear wheel skids.

    Section 2.4: Rear wheel skids 2
    In this section you will learn how to induce and control a rear-wheel slide while cornering. This section contains an exercise on how to use body position to prevent a rear wheel skid and how to use body position to induce and control a rear wheel skid while cornering

    Section 2.5: Hazard Non-Avoidance
    In this section you will learn what to do and what not to do (and why) when you come across a hazard that you cannot avoid. This section builds on the hazard non-avoidance section in MC1 by allowing you to practice the techniques over larger hazards on a bike equipped to do so.

    Section 2.6: Advanced bike stability exercises
    In this section you will learn more about why bikes are inherently stable and how to use body position and throttle control to maximise the stability of your bike. This section includes a series of exercises that will help you instinctively maximise the stability of your bike, especially when things get difficult.



    Machine Control 3 – using your own bike (training takes place on an airfield)

    Section 3.1: Advanced Braking II
    This section builds on the advanced braking exercises in Machine Control 1 & 2 and helps you learn more advanced techniques to confidently bring your bike to a halt from higher speeds.

    Section 3.2: Braking on bends I
    In this section you will understand the stories you have created around braking on bends. Here you will learn advanced techniques for reducing speed in a bend.

    Section 3.3: Braking on bends II
    In this section you will understand the stories you have created around braking on bends. Here you will learn advanced (race-track) techniques for braking hard in a bend.

    Section 3.4: Cornering
    In this section you will understand the stories you have created about cornering and will learn advanced techniques for cornering. This section will transform your ability to: safely and confidently lean the bike further; quickly and accurately change direction; and use body position to increase your corner speed

    Section 3.5: Riding over slippery surfaces
    In this section you will learn how to ride confidently over slippery surfaces. Specifically you will learn how to use body position to maximise the stability of your bike; and how to control a rear-wheel slide (braking and accelerating) on your own bike.




    Machine Control 4 – using Supermoto bikes (training is on an airfield SM track)

    This course is designed to help you understand and unlock the stories you have created that prevent you from safely understanding the limits of braking, cornering, accelerating and stability.

    Section 4.1: Very Advanced Braking
    In this section braking learn how to control the bike at extremes of braking.

    Section 4.2: Very Advanced Cornering
    In this section you will learn how to recognise your bike’s (and your own) cornering limits and how to control the bike at these limits

    Section 4.3: Very Advanced Acceleration
    In this section you will learn how to recognise your bike’s (and your own) acceleration limits and how to control the bike at these limits

    Section 4.4: Extreme Stability
    In this section you will learn how to safely and confidently corner on gravel and dirt. The section also includes techniques for slowing down and for accelerating on gravel and dirt. You will also learn to become confident in moving from tarmac to gravel/dirt and back to tarmac again.

  2. #2
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    i2icourse

    I did MC1 about 3 years ago and MC1 and MC3 last year and have got to say its the best value for money training I have ever spent, fantastic.

  3. #3
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    Sep 2005
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    Booked on MC1 for 23rd April.

    Looking forward to the course and doing a write up for my IAM group.
    Heard very good reports from the Edingburgh IAM group.
    "You haven't really traveled until you've gone back home"

  4. #4
    tomkilleen
    Guest
    Hi,

    yeah I ran some courses up there in East Fortune for the local IAM group. I would love to go up again, we just need aroun 12 riders who want to do MC1 and 3 (easier to run 2 courses over 2 days) adn we can book it in.

    Above all we are all about making riders feel that bikes can be much more fun when we are not worring about our skills, or lack off. It is simply not a factor, the bike does not reqiure our skill to get on with it, we just need to let it!!!!
    tom

  5. #5
    New Member (less than 15 Posts)
    Join Date
    Sep 2020
    Location
    Rufforth
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    1

    Greetings from Colton,
    I've just received an email about courses available at Rufforth Airfield. What is the price? Is it possible to receive a discount (I'm a student)? Thanks.
    Urs

  6. #6
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    Apr 2008
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    Guernsey
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    1,219
    Nine and a half years on, but this is still not a record.

    The search for truth is the search for the best hypothesis.
    Sir Karl Popper

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