GPX - Quarre les Tombes / Top of the Morvan

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Quarre les Tombes is a pretty good destination for anyone heading to the top of the Morvan. The village is on a major crossroads junction, so it gives access to lots of other roads into the region.

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https://maps.app.goo.gl/AwKFz5w846G2uB7j7?g_st=ic

It is a small to medium sized village but, for its size, is well served with:

Two bars / cafes

Two hotels and another three miles away

An unmanned self-service 24/7 twin pump petrol station: https://maps.app.goo.gl/Q4NPZ2UrG5naB4Gw9?g_st=ic

A decent area for parking by the church: https://maps.app.goo.gl/RTTvjAY2P9XQap968?g_st=ic You can also park on the main square but take care as there seems to be regular markets, when parking is restricted or banned

A chemist

A post office / cash point

A small Co-Op type shop

A decent bakery, next door to the hotel du Nord, which does takeaway filled baguettes. These are good just to sling into a tank bag or pannier for a picnic lunch.


The three hotels are:

https://www.hotel-morvan.fr/

I have stayed in the hotel du Nord, twice. I can recommend it but (if you worry about these sorts of things) it is:

A. Very French ie. the owner, Emilie, does not speak a whole lot of English but is absolutely charming and very helpful. Her father owns / runs the sister hotel, three miles away.

B. The menu is ‘Eat what we make’. Outside of the high summer season, the restaurant is closed for evening meals but you can eat in their sister hotel, about three miles down the road. As there was only three of us, Emilie gave us a lift there and back. Or try the bar / cafe across the square.

C. As with many village or rural hotels, it is closed much of December, January and February but the sister hotel is probably open.

D. The hotel is not huge (eight rooms only, I think) and may well get booked up in advance, especially in high summer.

E. There is no locked parking garage but you can (with a bit of a squeeze) get two 1600’s parked down the side of the hotel. I wouldn’t worry about leaving my bike or car on the street or in the public car park by the church. I did put a lock on my bike but that is only out of habit.

The sister hotel: http://www.auberge-de-latre.com/ This is outside of the village and has lots of parking. It is only three miles from Quarre les Tombes but it’s probably a bit too far to walk, as the rural D road has no footpath and certainly no street lights. It’s nice scenery but I don’t think it would be a particularly safe road to walk along, if you get my drift.

https://www.le-morvan.fr/ I haven’t stayed here but may well give it a go, just for something different. I am a big believer in trying places out, if only for a change.

All three are Logis establishments.; you’ll by-and-large, know what you’ll get. You can book each hotel direct or through the Logis (or other) websites.

All this being said, the Morvan is littered with large villages / small towns, many with hotels and B&B type cafes, all catering for tourists and blokes on motorcycles, pushbikes or cars. The major towns all have chain hotels, too.
 
Welcome.

I have been to the Morvan several times, usually (if I am with a group) staying at the Brit / Dak B&B hotel in Avallon: https://hotel-avallon-dakhotel.brithotel.fr/ which is perfectly adequate for a couple of nights, being only a short walk into the town to find a bar or restaurant.

Most often I have ridden around down southwards, deeper in to the Morvan. This time, just for a change, I / we took a 135 mile northern loop, right up to Auxerre. This takes you out of the Morvan but hey-ho, it’s just an alternative and the roads / scenery are still pretty good.

<iframe style="border:none;overflow:hidden" width="600" height="287" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" src="https://www.myrouteapp.com/embed/route/6927909?lang=en"></iframe>

The town of Vézelay: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vézelay is good for a coffee or lunch stop. We stopped for a coffee in the sun, which turned into two coffees. This made us 10 minutes late for the lunch stop I had hoped for at the old town of Noyers, with its gated entrance and cobbled street: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noyers,_Yonne Ten minutes is not much but Noyers (as we discovered and of course by now I should have known) shuts promptly at 14:00 on Sunday; it’s no good arriving at 14:10. Had I realised what time it was, I would probably have found something before or in Auxerre itself. It was though Easter Sunday, so many places were shut. There again, we didn’t leave Quarre les Tombes much before eleven. Both Vézelay and Noyers are popular destinations for bods on motorbikes, so I can safely say they are both ‘biker friendly’, knowing how important that is on these pages. Fear of the unknown and possibly hostile natives, is a terrible thing.

You’ll maybe notice that the route does not start right at the hotel’s front door and that it is not fully circular. I find it easier to have the start point up to a mile away, as that gives a modern GPS device or app (like an an XT or BMW’s Connected app) somewhere to aim for. Likewise, whilst most modern devices will run fully circular routes (where the start and end points are identical) I just prefer to end the route a little short, avoiding a full circle.

I have marked the fuel station, so bods can fuel up on their return. I am a big believer in always fully fuelling up on arrival, if possible. It saves time in the morning and avoids the all but inevitable “I need fuel”, 30 minutes into the next day, when you’d rather be cracking on.
 
Hotel looks good.

I like touring in the car, as it saves a lot of faffing about. Get up, have breakfast, jump in the car and drive off. Even using the same D roads as riders would take on a motorbike, there is not a lot of time difference, spread over a day, simply as there is so little traffic or even large towns in rural France to slow you down. It’s helped of course with most cars having a decent sized fuel tank.

My parents and us us kids always went on Continental family holidays through the 60’s and into the mid-70’s in the car, often camping. It was always good and it’s better now, as cars are so much better than they were.

I was telling ChasMill and Mrs ChasMill, who were with me over Easter, that I once forgot my skiddies, only discovering their absence on the Saturday morning in St Omer. No problem, I thought, I will buy some in the town….. not a pair to be found! I eventually tracked some down on a highly dodgy market stall. Bright day-glo fluorescent and a very shiny nylon. But, they were my saviour!
 
I anyone want to recreate the Easter jaunt, I’ll create a route folder at some point and share it here.

It definitely works well for anyone in the SE corner of England, with easy access to Dover / Folkestone and / or anyone arriving at the North Sea ports. They could hotfoot down, for sure. I have several alternative routes, so I’ll try to put them all in.
 
Hotel looks good.

I like touring in the car, as it saves a lot of faffing about. Get up, have breakfast, jump in the car and drive off. Even using the same D roads as riders would take on a motorbike, there is not a lot of time difference, spread over a day, simply as there is so little traffic or even large towns in rural France to slow you down. It’s helped of course with most cars having a decent sized fuel tank.

My parents and us us kids always went on Continental family holidays through the 60’s and into the mid-70’s in the car, often camping. It was always good and it’s better now, as cars are so much better than they were.

I was telling ChasMill and Mrs ChasMill, who were with me over Easter, that I once forgot my skiddies, only discovering their absence on the Saturday morning in St Omer. No problem, I thought, I will buy some in the town….. not a pair to be found! I eventually tracked some down on a highly dodgy market stall. Bright day-glo fluorescent and a very shiny nylon. But, they were my saviour!

NEVER be tempted to do a Micky and post a pic.....ever.
 
One thing I should have added. Many small rural, privately run, hotels in France are closed on Monday and often much (or all) of Tuesday. Take care if you are of the “Wing it, mate” persuasion. The hotel du Nord was shut (locked) on our arrival. This was actually my fault, as I had neglected to tell the owner what time we expected to arrive, mid-afternoon.

All was well, as I - as penance for my neglect of the basics - rode up to the sister hotel where, via the power of Franglais, the owner’s father understood the problem and summoned up his daughter for me. Others might balk at this, perhaps.
 
One thing I should have added. Many small rural, privately run, hotels in France are closed on Monday and often much (or all) of Tuesday. Take care if you are of the “Wing it, mate” persuasion. The hotel du Nord was shut (locked) on our arrival. This was actually my fault, as I had neglected to tell the owner what time we expected to arrive, mid-afternoon.

All was well, as I - as penance for my neglect of the basics - rode up to the sister hotel where, via the power of Franglais, the owner’s father understood the problem and summoned up his daughter for me. Others might balk at this, perhaps.

Similarly in rural Germany.
 
I anyone want to recreate the Easter jaunt, I’ll create a route folder at some point and share it here.

It definitely works well for anyone in the SE corner of England, with easy access to Dover / Folkestone and / or anyone arriving at the North Sea ports. They could hotfoot down, for sure. I have several alternative routes, so I’ll try to put them all in.

Here it is:

<iframe style="border:none;overflow:hidden" width="100%" height="562" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allow="geolocation" src="https://www.myrouteapp.com/embed/map/?folder=8016239&lang=en&user=25131&fitmarkers=true&origin=routes&unit=mi"></iframe>

Tap around in it, you can’t break it.

There are 10 suggestions in all, though there are so many ways to go that it could easily have been 20 or more. I have routes from assorted sources, my own, Michelin, Simon Weir to name but some. Hopefully though it will be good enough to give people some ideas. Really, you can’t go wrong getting to the Morvan from Calais or just riding about when you are there.

I like going via (roughly) Verdun but I have done it direct in both directions, including and excluding motorway. If you crack on, probably on your own, you can do London to Quarre les Tombes in a day, avoiding all motorways from Calais. Easier too on age way back, as you save the hour.
 
Here it is:

<iframe style="border:none;overflow:hidden" width="100%" height="562" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allow="geolocation" src="https://www.myrouteapp.com/embed/map/?folder=8016239&lang=en&user=25131&fitmarkers=true&origin=routes&unit=mi"></iframe>

Tap around in it, you can’t break it.

There are 10 suggestions in all, though there are so many ways to go that it could easily have been 20 or more. Hopefully though it will be good enough to give people some ideas. Really, yiu can’t go wrong getting to the Morvan from Calais or just riding about when you are there.

I like going via roughly Verdun but I have done it direct in both directions, including and excluding motorway. If you crack on, probably on your own, you can do London to Quarre les Tombes in a day, avoiding all motorways from Calais. Easier too on age way back, as you save the hour.

Linky no worky for me anyway.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
 
Linky no worky for me anyway.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro

are you clicking the blue dots which open to the routes? The hand in the background is to shift the map around by holding your mouse button down
 
Zoom in on the routes, to see more detail:

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And use MyRoute’s ability to display in Google’s Street view, to see what the roads are like:

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This crude screenshot will give an idea how many hotel possibilities there are in the Morvan.

Just find one that suits you, would be my recommendation.

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I have updated the public folder I created in MyRoute. It now includes RiDE magazine’s suggested two-day route between Calais and the Morvan.

As I said, there are lots of ways to get there, all variable on the time people have available and the type of roads they want to ride. There is no single “Tell me the best way…..” route. I guess I have been down to the Morvan or close by to Dijon thirty (or probably more) times. Each time it is something different, a ways dictated by different circumstances.

<iframe style="border:none;overflow:hidden" width="100%" height="565" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allow="geolocation" src="https://www.myrouteapp.com/embed/map?folder=8016239&lang=en&user=25131&fitmarkers=true&origin=routes&unit=mi"></iframe>
 
What is also maybe interesting is when you use MyRoute’s ability to lay several routes on top of each other, colouring each differently.

They all start from roughly the same place, and end up near enough at the same destination. You can also see where they converge. In this example, it’s Bar le Duc.

This is useful as it gives an easy idea of alternatives to take or act as a record of where you have been.

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