My first chance to use the mighty Himalayan properly

I thought Moules Marinières was the shellfish steamed in white wine then a sauce made by adding shallots and butter to get a nice emulsion.

If cream is involved then you have Moules à la Crème.

I think you are correct sir!
And in a bizarre case of quantum interconnectedness I can say that I read Wappings post this morning, didn't talk about it to wife, went shopping this afternoon and she telephoned to say she fancied Moules Marinières. At that point I was 100 yards from the local fish shop and thought that's a brilliant idea. Whilst getting other ingredients in our local Booths I came over all continental and bought a bottle of Ricard Pastis thinking about an aperitif.
So the Moules were great and she was mentioning the cream version, adding there's another variation involving Pastis. Ffs I said you could have mentioned that earlier, I really fancy it now. :blast

Ps Why is Wapping's meal accompanied by a portion of Wotsits?
 
Snails? :barf

I'm safe in the knowledge that we'll never do a sharing plate should we ever go on a joint wander.

And it's Le Cable Tie - they're very obviously masculine as no woman would know how to use one.*

*I say this as a dumbass who always puts a cable tie on the 'wrong way round' no matter how many times I take it off and put it back on. :blast
 
When en France, as they dit….

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Pas de ketchup, mais avec mayo. Tres continental!
 
Food in France, even in the smallest cafe's seems to be so much more appealing, much more so that your average cafe in Blighty. Good to hear the Himalayan is doing its stuff. I think I had to rotate my bars a little to get the right mirror position for the left hand mirror, as I think the mount has a peg to locate it in the bars.

Carry on sir, enjoying the trip report :)
 
A lovely wander.

The cable tie reminds me of this sticker, seen last summer. I want one!

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Safe home, Wappers.
 
Age incontinence? It'll happen to us all.....

Found the sticker!

Hope you dry out on the ferry/tunnel.
 
Back home, delayed only because at 19:30 they still have roads closed into E1, right back to the Blackwall Tunnel. The organisers hire dimwits to manage the road closure bollards and signs, who do not know if it is Christmas or Marble Arch.

I jumped the jam on the A13 by riding the bike across the staggered pelican crossings, to change carriageways. Similarly, I pushed the bike through the pedestrian area between Alie Street and Leman Street.

Besides the fallout from the Marathon, I did another 160 miles today, back across rural France. The bike now has over 800 miles on the clock and you can feel the engine has loosened up a lot.

Still very comfortable and completely happy in Biblical rain on the coastal D road between Cap Gris Nez and Calais. The water was pouring down the road and out of the heavens, with tidal waves being thrown up. I do think the horn might have packed up or been reduced to a pitiful ‘meeep’. We shall see.

Things to do:

See if I can do something about the left hand mirror. It’s not so bad in the UK but it’s a bit of a bugger abroad.

Fit a simple chain oiler, as recommended to me by gspod, who also gave me several other useful tips.

Find some decent inner bags for the standard RE panniers. There is a slight leak in both panniers, but no worse than the much more expensive BMW spam tins. I’ll do what I did on my GSA and drill a small hole at the panniers’ lowest point, so the water drains out.

See if the horn is blasting or meeeping or dead. It’ll be covered by the warranty or maybe the fuse has gone? We shall see.
 
Back home, delayed only because at 19:30 they still have roads closed into E1, right back to the Blackwall Tunnel. The organisers hire dimwits to manage the road closure bollards and signs, who do not know if it is Christmas or Marble Arch.

I jumped the jam on the A13 by riding the bike across the staggered pelican crossings, to change carriageways. Similarly, I pushed the bike through the pedestrian area between Alie Street and Leman Street.

Besides the fallout from the Marathon, I did another 160 miles today, back across rural France. The bike now has over 800 miles on the clock and you can feel the engine has loosened up a lot.

Still very comfortable and completely happy in Biblical rain on the coastal D road between Cap Gris Nez and Calais. The water was pouring down the road and out of the heavens, with tidal waves being thrown up. I do think the horn might have packed up or been reduced to a pitiful ‘meeep’. We shall see.

Things to do:

See if I can do something about the left hand mirror. It’s not so bad in the UK but it’s a bit of a bugger abroad.

Fit a simple chain oiler, as recommended to me by gspod, who also gave me several other useful tips.

Find some decent inner bags for the standard RE panniers. There is a slight leak in both panniers, bun no worse than the much more expensive BMW spam tins. I’ll do what I did on my GSA and drill a small hole at the panniers’ lowest point, so the water drains out.

See if the horn is blasting or meeeping or dead. It’ll be covered by the warranty or maybe the fuse has gone? We shall see.

Just a point regarding the panniers and their slight leak …

How tightly have you done up the knurled disc inside ? My dealer suggested doing them up finger tight, then tightening the nut against the disc if that makes sense. Apparently tightening the disc too much pulls the panniers slightly out of true, causing leaks.

I’ve had no leaks in mine, and I’ve been out in some dreadful weather.

I went for these pannier bags:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/30392515...3ZUCznFTgu&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

Royal Enfield do a dry bag style version:

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/19444572...3ZUCznFTgu&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
Thank you.

The near side pannier had a little bit of water, the off side more. I’ll try your method.
 
And it's Le Cable Tie - they're very obviously masculine as no woman would know how to use one.*

You’re not far off, they are indeed masculine (although I have no idea why) and are known as “un colson” or “les colsons” should you ever need to source some whilst in French France :thumb2

For example “Bonjour monsieur, je cherche des colsons, j’ai encore niqué ma brêle”
 
It’s 88 road miles from my house in London E1 and Cap Grus Nez. It shows how close we came to being invaded in 1940.
I do envy your proximity to the channel crossings. I arrived in Dover a couple of days ago and its 240 miles to home. Hull is much closer for me but you have to sell a kidney for that crossing.
 


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