Engine Oil - to Change or not to change?!?

Palerider

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I was out this afternoon and realised that my oil level was waaaay to low.

Put in 1/2 a liter of what turned out to be semi synthetic engine oil :eek: even though it didn't say it anywhere on the damn bottle!:spitfire

So, the question is, should I drain the oil and change it? If so, what, precisely, should I change it for? Should I use an engine flush or what?:eek The bike has done 2,000 miles....

All advice appreciated....

:eek:

P
 
As long as the oil you used is an appropriate viscosity and to API SF, SG or SH (see the handbook) then I can't see a problem. I top up with a fully synthetic 10W50 for no better reason than I've got several 1-litre bottles of it. The reservation about synthetic oils seems to be that they lubricate so well that the engine never runs in. That being so, the worst your semi-synthetic will do is escape past the piston rings and burn. It will however give you enough time to buy your preferred lubricant before the engine dies of lack of oil. Just keep checking the level. I certainly wouldn't change the oil unless you used 5W30 ot a supermarket's finest chip fat.
 
some full synths dont mix with normal, most semi,s do
 
AFAIK, synthetic, semi-synthetic and dinosaur oils are cross-compatible and you are unlikely to do any damage whatsoever. Assuming it was a semi-synthetic oil of a suitable grade and spec ?

If it is not written on the bottle, how do you know it is semi-synth ?
 
This is what I put in...

GPS1

Sorry. Still learning all about oils!! :eek:

I now know it's semi synthetic cos I was concerned about knackering said engine and looked it up.

So, you think it'll be OK? What should I use if I'm doing an oil change in ideal circumstances???
 
As well as the GS tyre test, there is also a useful write up on oil in September's Bike magazine.

Synthetic oil is basically the same stuff as standard, just with synthesised molecules so that the mix is tightly controlled to the required specification. With mineral oil, the oil grade contains a much wider range of molecule types from the distillation process. The properties of synthetic are therefore more consistent and predictable than with mineral oil.

Assuming semi-synthetic is a blend of synthetic and mineral oils, there should be no reason why these are not compatible.

Synthetic oil is just better oil made to a higher specification that gives better lubrication. There is some merit in allowing wear by using a mineral oil during running in, but once the engine is not burning oil, why encourage more wear?

Incidentally, this write up was from Rock Oil. On the Castrol web site, the recomendation for the GS is a synthetic oil.

Buy the best oil you can afford and your engine will last longer.
 
Pheeeeeewwwww:thumb

Was panicking there for a second!:tears

Feel a bit of a :peach: really! :eek:

thanks for your help.

P
 
As well as the GS tyre test, there is also a useful write up on oil in September's Bike magazine.

Synthetic oil is basically the same stuff as standard, just with synthesised molecules so that the mix is tightly controlled to the required specification. With mineral oil, the oil grade contains a much wider range of molecule types from the distillation process. The properties of synthetic are therefore more consistent and predictable than with mineral oil.

Assuming semi-synthetic is a blend of synthetic and mineral oils, there should be no reason why these are not compatible.

Synthetic oil is just better oil made to a higher specification that gives better lubrication. There is some merit in allowing wear by using a mineral oil during running in, but once the engine is not burning oil, why encourage more wear?

Incidentally, this write up was from Rock Oil. On the Castrol web site, the recomendation for the GS is a synthetic oil.

Buy the best oil you can afford and your engine will last longer.

100% common sense!

:thumb

Greg
 


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